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I have a 5-gallon pail of honey in a tightly controlled water bath to de-crystallize it. I measured the temperature a couple of days ago and it was at 105F, and had been in the bath already for a couple of days at that point. I poured the honey into my bottling pail last night, and while it looked mostly liquid, when the last bit was flowing out, there were still crystals, and there was a 1/8" layer of crystals still on the bottom of the pail.

How long should this process to fully de-crystallize the honey take? The overall time I've had it in this bath is approaching a week now.
 

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I use an inkbird digital controller and increased 1 degree at a time until my 2lbs plastic containers of wildflower honey (sometimes heavy on goldenrod) completely liquified. 111 degrees was the magic temperature. I wired a fan in my warming container so I know there aren't hot/ cold spots too.
 

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We had 118 degrees F daytime temperature in Paso Robles earlier this year. I was surprised that the bees made it - wax came out of the frames at 116 a few years back in Ojai, and all the bees left.

To be sure, different enzymes, vitamins, and probiotics degrade at different temperatures. For the most part, honey is still good up to 125 to 130 degrees F, about as warm as Mother Nature makes the atmosphere. True, some lower-temp probiotic microorganisms responsible for some of the nutrition will be in decline at 130 degrees F, but many (probably most) others can tolerate it, for a few hours, at least.

Michael Palmer - Please tell us how you put the "degree" symbol on the screen!
 

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Although your bees will fan in the summer to keep the brood nest at 95F, your honey super on top may get warmer. My temperature sensor just under the lid in mid-summer sun just tops 100F. However, most sources I have read say never exceed 120F. Even at 95F after a period of time your enzymes start to degrade. Above that temperature, the degradation increases sort of exponentially with temperature. Also, you need to heat above 104F just to start liquifying the glucose crystals. Personally, I split the difference and heat at 112F and stir up the bottom of the bucket twice a day. That procedure usually works on a 5 gallon bucket in about 2+ days.
Here is an 18 inch SS spoon from Amazon that works for me:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00915HWP6/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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Michael Palmer - Please tell us how you put the "degree" symbol on the screen!
° Windows 10 pc with number pad on right. Place cursor where you want symbol. Hold alt and type 0176 ° should appear.
I think you can copy/paste the symbol after that instead of retyping the 0176.
 
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