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What is the best way to de-crystalize honey in plastic?

This year I bottled most of my honey in plastic 1lb jars and notice that its starting to crystalize. Until now I have always used glass jars.
 

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Yes same as glass. If you have them labeled already use a dehydrator. Use the top and bottom with cardboard(or stiff plastic) to make an enclosure connecting top and bottom creating a chamber to put bottles in. Anyway to keep a chamber heated around 120 deg F will decrystalize honey.
 

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Wow I am learning something else! Beeslave could you be more specific on the way to decrystalize? Or point out a web site. This could be very valuable info. Thanks Brent Cook.
 

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i use a Styrofoam cooler and place a seedling mat in it. the mat is used to encourage germination of seeds and warms up to around 80 degrees. the inside of the cooler gets into the low 90's and I let the plastic bottles sit for about 6 hrs while they slowly turn back to liquid honey.
 

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Beeslave could you be more specific on the way to decrystalize? .
If you are talking about the dehydrator. Make a cylinder out of card board or flexible sheet plastic(rigid not poly) the diameter of the dehydrator and taller than your bottles. Set the bottles on the dehydrator bottom. Put home made cylinder around bottles and put on dehydrator top. If the dehydrator has variable temp set it between 100-120 deg F. 12-24 hrs it should be crystal free, maybe even sooner. Dorm style fridge(preferably a cheap one that doesn't work) with a light bulb(on bottom with heat shield directly above) hooked to a thermostat(with sensor hooked underneath bottom rack) set at 100-120 deg F. Stack bottles on racks above heat shield(don't over load with to much weight). The larger quantity you need to do the larger you make your decrystalizing device. Rack style upright incubators work also as do these devices I described work for incubators. As stated in post #6 works you can also use a water bed heat pad as it has a thermostat and sensor probe already and you can place that on the bottom of any enclosed device you wish.
 

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Thanks Slave, neat ideas. But wouldn't anything work that would keep them around 100 degrees?
 

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To add to beeslave I use a hive body placed on top of an inner cover and cut a piece of plywood with a cutout for my dehydrator set on top. I can do bottles in a medium and add another to do 5 gallon pails. I do plastic all the time at 110 to 115 degrees works great!
 

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Stack empty deep hive bodys,,put a metal queen excluder above first box, hang trouble light from excluder, put bottles on excluder,put cover on check temp. and your done. 3 boxes will do a 5 gal. pail.
 

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I use an old refridgerater with a lightbulb inside. It's great for warming or liquifying a bucket of honey too.

Does anyone know where I can get a cheap thermostat which I can wire to the bulb to make sure it doesn't overheat? I thought a glass aquarium thermostat in a blottle of water would do, but I can't find one with an upper limit which is high enough.

Geoff
 

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You need something like this. This one is a spendy one but it gives you an idea what you need. Contact your local HVAC tech and tell him what you need a thermostat for and they should be able to direct you to the right model.
http://www.heatersplus.com/tstat.htm

Google- "120v thermostat switch"

120v hot water heater themostats are cheap($20.00) and will work but they don't come with thermocouple and they leave to many exposed connections.
 

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One has to be careful with plastic containers. Some don't take heat well and can become distorted if not careful. Warm them by wrapping in a heating pad set on a low or medium setting is one way to decrystalize.

Now, for an ounce of prvention- if I have to store for some time before it is sold, I make room in the freezer. Many of my customers who buy by the gallon do the same. I often sell a gallon with a 'baby bear'. The bear is for the table top and the remainder of the gallon or whatever container goes in the freezer. They can set it out to unthaw, refill then replace into the freezer.

Our lightet honey from this past harvest crystalyzes almost before your eyes. It's been a real challenge keeping it from going solid. It sure made for a good creamed honey base, though!
 

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Walter Kelley used to sell a stat setup that you could use with an old fridge. I don't see it in their online catalog now though. Couldn't hurt to give them a call.
 

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If you don't have a lot, try putting it in the oven with the light on.
My oven stays 90-100F with nothing more than the light on. That way you won't wreck the labels.
 
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