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I have some honey that crystalized.

What are some easy ways to make it liquid again while not overheating it so it keeps all the qualities?

Will it remain in this liquid form for long?
 

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It depends on how much you have but if you are talking about a few jars, warm water in a pot works well. I heat the water on very low until it is about half liquid, then shut it off. You can also put jars in the dishwasher which has worked for me. Heat to lowest temp to keep as much of the natural qualities. Higher heat will keep it liquid for much longer, but it kills flavor and potential benefits. J
 

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If a couple of jars, put them on the dash of you car in the morning. Depending upon temps you’ll have it liquid again by lunch or dinner time.
 

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I aim for as natural as possible. I figure about 100 degrees is about max natural temp of honey in the hive in our area. So goal is to heat to 100. This can be accomplished in a few ways, mainly depending on your resources and the amount of honey. Eg: You can put an incandescent light in a bee box with queen excluder on top. Then jars on queen excluder with another box and lid. Use a thermometer to make sure you are not over heating. Or use a food dehydrator. At low temps it can take a few days to liquify, depending on volume. If it only takes a short time to liquify you are more likely to be removing some of the benefits of raw honey.
Why do you want to liquify it? Why not enjoy it crystallized?
 

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Why not just eat it? It will stay on your toast better, sweeten your tea all the same, and you can get a lot more on a spoon.
 

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Reheating enough to have honey that is basically liquid (that is most of it can be poured from a jar) is NOT DECRYSTALLIZED. The coarsest crystals will not have dissolved and those will set the pattern for the rest of the liquid that will very shortly recrystallize.

I dont know whether some crystals that form in some honeys have mineral salts or what their composition is, but to get the last of them gone will take a long ways above 100F. and a few days!
 

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Agreed crofter. I should have said liquified instead of decrystallized. All raw honey crystallizes. I have had jars reliquified in dehydrator at 100 for 2 days that go from solid (hold sidways with the lid off and honey does not move) to liquid ("clear", runny honey, no crystallizing "cloud") and stay runny for four months before it started to fog up /crystallize again.... I am not trying to compete with supermarkets, I want my honey to be easily verified as the real deal by my customers. So for me crystallized is best. However, I want them to be able to get the honey out of the smaller muth jars so I do liquify some.
 

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Amibusiness; My honey from this location behaves very similar to your description. When it does start to set up it is not excessively gritty. Honey from at least one of my sons locations in eastern Ontario crystallizes much quicker and seems to take quite a high temperature to decrystallize. He has a lot of yellow rocket; wild mustard that is in the brassica family. Here I have more trefoil.

I have been following a similar thread on a New Zealand forum (Oldtimers trapping ground) and they have honeys with wildly different characteristics from area to area. Similar discrepancies in experience with crystallizing and decrystallizing.

A flat statement that "Honey can be decrystallized in a few days at 100 F.) is often not correct at all.
 

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A particular extraction from last year is given to crystalizing in the cellar. I warmed it up warm water. It started to bubble (fermented?) and stopped after a while. It turned into a very nice tasting honey. My neighbors love it.

I may give a go at making some meade.
 

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Agree again crofter.... Back to all beekeeping being local. So the above works with our spring and summer honeys. (We harvest the bulk of our honey in July - early August.) We don't have canola/rape or heather, two examples of honey that behaves very differentlybfrom ours and is much more of a pain to work with 🙂
 

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Im in the same boat. I have about 15 lbs in the plastic jars thats crystallized. I also have about 40 lbs in a 5 gallon bucket that is crystallized. Not sure what to do with the bucket full as its hard to package. I put some in wax paper and put it by the cluster for an upcoming cold snap but that still leaves about 39lbs. Oddly, the texture is GREAT. Its mightly close to creamed honey as the grains are VERY fine.
Considering doing creamed honey with it, but from what I am reading I need more equipment to heat the honey ("need more equipment" should be stamped on every beehive as a disclaimer.
 

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Z: if bucket has no honeygate use warm water bath or bulb as described above. (i don't like to submerge honey gate though I doubt water can get in.) Some use an insulated box like old freezer with light bulb for heat. It takes a while at low temp with these methods but works. I like the bulb because it is constant temp. Water bath on 40 gallons I think youd need to renew the water to keep it warm.... Just don't get any in your bucket...! You can also mix periodically to speed it up but I never do. Works here 🙂
Or use higher temp and risk changing the enzyme content of your honey but liquify it quicker....
 

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I have a double oven in my kitchen. It is not as big as the oven attached to my range in the basement and so might get a little hotter then some ovens, though I doubt it does. I just set the jars in the oven with the light on. It usually takes more then one day there to get it completely liquid. I have never put a thermometer to check the temp but have turned the oven on for a second to see what it starts at. The highest I have ever seen is 115 degrees.

It is not a fast project and it is a little work cause I do swirl or lightly agitate the jars a few times to get the stuff on the bottom mixed in. It seems to last for a bit if you do a good job and leave it in long enough.
I figure there are times where the honey gets 115 in the supers during summer and so think I am maybe not killing all the good things that might be in honey.

Cheers
gww
 

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My method- place honey pail into large fermenter bucket (normally used for mead fermenting), then add water into fermenter bucket so the honey pail is surrounded, then put heating belt on the fermenter and plug into thermostat (cheap one used by seed growers) with thermal probe placed in the fermenter. Set thermostat to 36C and leave it for few days. Summer honey decrystalize beautifully, but fall honey leaves large crystals that will stay there unless temperature is cranked way up.

All above equipment is standard for anyone who makes mead (most beekeepers I guess?), so no extra expense or equipment required.
 

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I have a slightly different take on this. Dump crystalized honey into fermenter bucket, add hot water, yeast, and nutrients. Wait 4-6 weeks. No more crystalized honey.
 

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I have a slightly different take on this. Dump crystalized honey into fermenter bucket, add hot water, yeast, and nutrients. Wait 4-6 weeks. No more crystalized honey.
Ah, now we're talking :) Unfortunately mead from fall honey (mostly goldenrod) have not turned too good for me 2 years in a row (I must be doing something wrong), summer honey works much better and I always end up with a surplus of fall honey and not enough of summer one...
 

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Im in the same boat. I have about 15 lbs in the plastic jars thats crystallized. I also have about 40 lbs in a 5 gallon bucket that is crystallized. Not sure what to do with the bucket full as its hard to package. I put some in wax paper and put it by the cluster for an upcoming cold snap but that still leaves about 39lbs. Oddly, the texture is GREAT. Its mightly close to creamed honey as the grains are VERY fine.
Considering doing creamed honey with it, but from what I am reading I need more equipment to heat the honey ("need more equipment" should be stamped on every beehive as a disclaimer.
For the bucket of honey I use a heater blanket that plugs into 120V. I bought the "Bee Blanket" at a bee supply store. It takes up to a week to get an entire 5 gallone bucket liquid again. I do this before I bottle as it is much easier to bottle free flowing honey than something sluggish.
 

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I sometimes get real fancy and use the Sous Vide cooker with a canning bath pot. I can fit 7 quarts or a dozen or more pints and half pints and they can be stacked. I set the Sous Vide to 105 degrees and things get nice and loose pretty fast. I knew I would find a good use for the Sous Vide tool.
 
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