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Hello,

Check out the new pics!

Questions:
1) If I understand what I am looking at, it looks like some good worker brood baking under those caps. Should I be concerned with the somewhat spotty nature of the laying pattern? It is on foundationless frames (started from scratch), so some of the eggs were laid one day, more comb was built, then more eggs laid, etc. This was occurring while workers were busy storing away nectar/sugar syrup and pollen into any hole they could find. Hope they reorganize things once there is more comb to go around.

2) Comb seems a bit malleable still. I am almost afraid to move it being so soft. How long typically before it hardens up and is firmly attached to the frame?

3) The frames (all medium 8 frame) are about 2/3 full of comb with the exceptions of the frames at the end that are still not drawn. I assume as soon as the babies emerge, there will be an accelerated growth in comb and a steady cycle of brood. When should I start putting in empty frames to build out and seed the next box? How is that done? Do I put an empty frame in between the capped brood and come back in a couple days to remove it (with eggs, etc. that might be in there) and keep this up until I have some nice comb to start the next box?

Thank you all in advance for your wisdom!
 

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Everything looks good.At 3 weeks the pattern will look more solid.Even the best queens miss a few cells here and there.If the queen is VSH(patterns usually are spotty) get used to that.Handle combs straight up and down,never turn them on their side.Takes awhile(a number of brood cycles)before comb becomes more ridgid.Be very gentle during hot weather!Myself(all beekeepers have their own way)I would wait until brood are just starting to emerge before I'd super and seed.I like to seed with a frame of honey and a frame of emerging brood or a frame of uncapped honey and a frame of eggs.Either work for me.Please call them emerging brood or new bees not babies,just saying.They're developing not baking(they do generate heat while developing).Not trying to be a jerk just trying to help you learn the terminology,that's all.I'm also foundationless have been for years.Looks like you have a really good start!Foundationless:applause:
 

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You have it going on, The bees are boing extremely well, especially as far north as you are.

New comb is very thin walled, as it becomes older and used more the house bees continually recoat it with each cleaning, this thickens it and makes it more durable. Handle it with kit gloves until they get it 360 attached. and as Slow Drone always hold it vertical.

Congrats!
 
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