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i believe it does. Just my own experience seems the more "sealed up from light' the trap the better success ive had. Having said that i have also caught a swam in an empty box outside with no cover that i had not got around to putting away so perhaps its not so important. I do though try to make sure my home made swarm traps have good tight joins and are dark inside.
 

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Have not caught enough swarms to get a baseline, but one was into a trap with gaps around the upper lid, so some light getting in isn't a complete deal killer.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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need to paint the inside black no
can make it from see thru materials no, except for the entrance no light should get in.
 

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I was going to try coroplast. Some of them are translucent.
try a few.
I am thinking with no data other than my hunch, it will not work as well.

If the swarms are many you may still do fine.
If you have old comb to melt down,, a coating of the dark beeswax on the interior may do the dual duty of blocking light and offering the scent of a pre used bee hovel.

What about some cheap wall paper, or paste and thick paper, for the inside. However IF the light goes thru there could be heating of the interior so keep that in mind when doing placement. in full sun could heat up inside.

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
try a few.
I am thinking with no data other than my hunch, it will not work as well.

If the swarms are many you may still do fine.
If you have old comb to melt down,, a coating of the dark beeswax on the interior may do the dual duty of blocking light and offering the scent of a pre used bee hovel.

What about some cheap wall paper, or paste and thick paper, for the inside. However IF the light goes thru there could be heating of the interior so keep that in mind when doing placement. in full sun could heat up inside.

GG
I figure I could paint the outside. I have lots of oops paint.
 

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I think it is pretty clear that bees (maybe queens in particular) are not big fans of light in the brood chamber. At least they don’t seem to like to have light where it was dark a minute ago. Of course, you can still find completely exposed hives. There are exceptions to everything in bee preferences

Seeley found that traps drilled full of small holes were no less effective than traps that were tight. His theory is that bees don’t mind this drafty situation in choosing a home, because they can easily fix it with propolis.

bottom line - I try to make my traps as inviting to bees as possible. If I had a trap that was letting a lot of light in, I would make reasonable efforts to remedy that.
 

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I figure I could paint the outside. I have lots of oops paint.
that works
check the inside temp on a sunny day.
set one up in the yard while the paint is drying/airing out, toss a thermometer in.
I wonder if sun gets to the paint how much thermal change would be generated.
maybe make 1 first to test the temp. 100+ inside during the day would not be a useable unit.

from a smell point of view maybe paint the outside so the sun does not warm as much, and the paint smell needs not be overcome.
 
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