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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

Can someone explain to me how the hand-holds are cut in the hive and super boxes? How do the retailers do it?

I'm sure it is either cut by a router or most likely a shaper. Has anyone seen this set-up and is it something a person building his/her own boxes could do?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you have a jig to hold the board down and then raise the blade?
I have seen hand-holds as you describe.
The dado set up I use only has a width of 7/8" and I can hardly get my fingers in that space.
I have heard that some will clamp the board on the table saw with the blade set on a 45 degree and crank it up vertical to create the hand-hold.
Anyone done or seen this?

Thanks!
 

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Dude,

Just nail a cleat to each side. More to grip, easier to lift and heck of a lot easier to fabricate then cutting a handhold into the wood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Dude,

My question is how are the commercial hand-holds cut. :)
I made 40 medium boxes today and in the midst of screwing on cleats I pondered how the hand-holds were cut.
I'm mainly asking for pollination purposes since the cleats take up more space.
 

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Hand holds

Like river rat said dado blade.Myself I like to screw a 1x2 board across the front and back for handles.The way I see it if you cut a1/2 in. into the front,sides and back for hand holds you only have a 1/4 in. left and this weakens the hive in these areas and cuts down on insulation in these areas.But I have to say i!ve never had one break through.Jack
 

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I also do the same thing, but I rob some of the chipper blades from a second dado set so that I am cutting handles that are 1 1/8” wide instead of 7/8”wide. Makes it easier on my fingers that way.
 

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A custom blade is used to make the scalloped cut at the mills where they are built.

There was a thread not long ago that described set up and cranking the blade into the stock. I'm sure a search through the forums will pop it up for you.

Personally I don't have the time to spend on it building as much as I tend to build, when I find the time to do that even. A dado cut is perfectly fine as far as I'm concerned. I have also been know to use cleats and like them best actually, but yes you do have a point when it comes to packing them up.
 

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Making Hand Holds on a Table Saw

Making Hand Holds on a Table Saw
The most often asked question on making your own beekeeping equipment: How do you make professional looking hand holds? The answer appeared in the July issue of Bee Culture. You make a jig that holds the tops and sides over the table saw blade. Taking multiple light cuts, tilt the arbor while the blade spins, raise the blade a little more and return to the 90 degree position. Raise the blade again and tilt. Repeat until done. You are cutting sideways, using the saw’s set to remove the wood. The result is superior to the commercial molding cutters because there is no tear out. The disadvantage: it takes almost a minute to cut one hand hold.

In the near future, we’ll have the plans available at www.petersieling.com .
Box factories use an arbor that can cut out the hand holds
_______________________________________________

Hive making workshop at the EAS Conference

<>Taught by David Peregmon, one of the EAS Directors. This sounds interesting and I expect to attend, Thursday, Aug 9 at the U of Delaware. David works on hands in his spare time—physical therapy, I think. He sees a lot of hands damaged by woodworking machinery so you can expect a lot of warnings about safety.
Most of my power tools are 50-100 years old, so I don’t even know what safety guards look like. It’s a good rule of thumb, whether you have safety guards on not: make jigs that cover the blades so you can’t even reach them with your hands.

Regards,
Ernie
 

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any interest in a profesional hand hold cutter

I got acccess to a company that can build the special cutter to build professional looking hand holds. They will be on the expensive side for the initial investment but would come with replaceble cutting teeth. I would say it would be around 200.00 to 300.00 for cutter and body that would fit your table saw. How many would be interested in buying one. If there is enough interest I will check things out
 

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Making Hand Holds on a Table Saw
The most often asked question on making your own beekeeping equipment: How do you make professional looking hand holds? The answer appeared in the July issue of Bee Culture. You make a jig that holds the tops and sides over the table saw blade. Taking multiple light cuts, tilt the arbor while the blade spins, raise the blade a little more and return to the 90 degree position. Raise the blade again and tilt. Repeat until done. You are cutting sideways, using the saw’s set to remove the wood. The result is superior to the commercial molding cutters because there is no tear out. The disadvantage: it takes almost a minute to cut one hand hold.
Wrong! No way does it have to take a minute to cut a handhold. You don't have to raise the blade in increments - use only one tilt up to cut, and then back down to position another side of the box. Easiest thing to do - I don't understand why the concept of cutting handholds is so daunting to folks making their own equipment! For specifics see my procedure in the search link I just provided. Easy as pie!

MM
 

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It was one of several suggestions to one persons question.
Ernie
Sorry, Eanie, didn't mean to offend, but your post from someone's blog suggested that making hand holds is difficult and time-consuming, when in fact, any chimp can do it.

This link lost the images, but here is at least a description of the process. If I wasn't so lazy, and had a means to post pictures, I would.

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=1526.0


MM
 

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Yes, that is the way it is done on a table saw.
Only don't try to do it in one shot - do it in small bites. . .


Do you have a jig to hold the board down and then raise the blade?
I have seen hand-holds as you describe.
The dado set up I use only has a width of 7/8" and I can hardly get my fingers in that space.
I have heard that some will clamp the board on the table saw with the blade set on a 45 degree and crank it up vertical to create the hand-hold.
Anyone done or seen this?

Thanks!
 

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Yes, that is the way it is done on a table saw.
Only don't try to do it in one shot - do it in small bites. . .
I haven't had any problems with slowing feeding the blade into the wood. You have to remember -- you are working at an angle, so the teeth are naturally taking slow bites into the wood. Don't expect to raise the blade angle quickly - take it slow and easy, and the cut will be clean. Pine is relatively soft, not like a hardwood which would bind and burn.

I would recommend only using this technique on a cabinet saw which has the horsepower to do the cut, and not use a thin kerf blade. Use a blade with an ATB (alternative top bevel), and you aren't going to burn the wood. Also, I have weights which I place on top of the box - don't ever try this procedure without either clamping or weighing the box down!

As a side note, running wood at an angle into a saw blade is a common way to produce wood cove molding, and if done correctly, is a relatively safe procedure:

http://www.woodworkerszone.com/wiki/index.php?title=Cove_Molding_on_the_Table_Saw

In this case with cove molding, you should only raise the blade in small increments - working with the tilted blade on your bee box hand holds is a different procedure than hitting the blade at a 45°...


MM
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
MapMan & RiverRat

MapMan, can you post or send me a picture of the jig. I have a pretty good idea of what it looks like but a picture it worth a thousand words!

RiverRat, could you post or send me details of the cutter. I'm picturing a tapered dado blade type device.

Thanks guys!!
 

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MapMan, can you post or send me a picture of the jig. I have a pretty good idea of what it looks like but a picture it worth a thousand words!

RiverRat, could you post or send me details of the cutter. I'm picturing a tapered dado blade type device.

Thanks guys!!


I am going to get in touch with my tool grinder at work and see what it will cost to grind the removble blades I will machine the body my self Can you open and look aat dxf file sif so I will send them to you when I gt it modeled up

The intitial investment of the cutter bodie is what will be costly
 

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MapMan, can you post or send me a picture of the jig. I have a pretty good idea of what it looks like but a picture it worth a thousand words!

RiverRat, could you post or send me details of the cutter. I'm picturing a tapered dado blade type device.

Thanks guys!!
I'll try to take some pics tomorrow after I plow my drive again! Looks like we are gonna get slammed with another foot. This season is beginning like last season, where we got ten feet of snow...

The jig is crude and simple, but a picture is a thousand words or something like that. I'll email it to someone who wants to place it on their image hosting site. I don't have the time or inclination to do that, as I had a project come in today which has a tight deadline, as usual.

MM
 
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