Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

cut out survival

1330 5
what percent of cutouts survive and become strong hives
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,344 Posts
It depends on the time of year and also on your technique. I try not to keep ALL the brood as it seems to spread them too thin. But I want enough to anchor them and to not waste too much of it. I don't try to save the honey combs as it just makes a mess. If you get too much honey on the caps of the brood the brood can't breath and the brood dies. If you get too much honey on the bees they die. If you use a vacuum and they get too hot they die... but if you have plenty of bees to cover what comb you give them they usually do well. If there are not enough bees to cover the comb, the small hive beetles often take over and then they abscond...

So, to recap, try to keep the bees from getting too sticky (a bucket of water to keep things like your gloves and bee brush from getting too messy) and the brood comb from getting too sticky. Don't try to save ALL the brood comb. Just do the big chunks and scrap the little pieces (feed them to the chickens). Either harvest or scrap the honey (depending on how much you trust the people that they did no spray and how clean you can keep it). If there are not an excess of bees to cover all the combs, remove some of them. Put them in as few boxes as they fit in until they get settled and start filling it up. I try to always have some open brood preferably from the cutout, but you can put a frame of open brood from another colony if there isn't any. Usually if there isn't any, they just swarmed and maybe they do or don't have a virgin queen. Also the open brood not only gives them the means to make a queen if they need to, but it helps anchor them better than capped brood does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,489 Posts
Pretty much what MB says. Don't have many issues, but later in the year, more prone to absconding, best to anchor the queen in a push-in for a few days. I don't add any brood, but if you pre-measure your cuts on the comb, you can be more efficient at maximizing or I guess, minimizing the number of frames you need while using all the good comb. Honey is crush and strained for most part. We do use some 'cage' frames that can do misc comb pieces and honey if needed though. I think out of the 40 we did this year or so..... 5 absconded, the rest survived. All the absconds were in the last two months as well for the most part and two were very stressed as they were discovered by surprise and the cover where all the comb was attached was dropped rapidly or sideways mashing a lot of the comb. One tip that may help as well, if all their comb is old dark comb, get them off of it ASAP and onto fresh new comb, they will do much better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It depends on the time of year and also on your technique. I try not to keep ALL the brood as it seems to spread them too thin. But I want enough to anchor them and to not waste too much of it. I don't try to save the honey combs as it just makes a mess. If you get too much honey on the caps of the brood the brood can't breath and the brood dies. If you get too much honey on the bees they die. If you use a vacuum and they get too hot they die... but if you have plenty of bees to cover what comb you give them they usually do well. If there are not enough bees to cover the comb, the small hive beetles often take over and then they abscond...

So, to recap, try to keep the bees from getting too sticky (a bucket of water to keep things like your gloves and bee brush from getting too messy) and the brood comb from getting too sticky. Don't try to save ALL the brood comb. Just do the big chunks and scrap the little pieces (feed them to the chickens). Either harvest or scrap the honey (depending on how much you trust the people that they did no spray and how clean you can keep it). If there are not an excess of bees to cover all the combs, remove some of them. Put them in as few boxes as they fit in until they get settled and start filling it up. I try to always have some open brood preferably from the cutout, but you can put a frame of open brood from another colony if there isn't any. Usually if there isn't any, they just swarmed and maybe they do or don't have a virgin queen. Also the open brood not only gives them the means to make a queen if they need to, but it helps anchor them better than capped brood does.
did my first cutout 2 days later they died,i gave them all the honey back in a box over the hive I think I coated the bees with honey. I won't do that again
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top