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Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday i did a c/o and was wondering what to do with all the honey to separate from the comb? Saw some youtube videos but wanted peoples methods.
 

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What a sweet problem to have 馃榿 Crush and strain works for me. How are the bees? Good score 馃憤
 

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Unfortunately the bees are dead. They鈥檝e been gone for sometime because there was no evidence of brood eggs or anything. A lot of the honey is in darker comb and a lot of it seems to be crystallized. Not runny at all. We have had cold nights. Just not sure what to do with it.
 

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warm it on a stove, strain, use for baking.

Have any bear hunting friends? freeze offer for the season.

GG
 

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For sure I would NOT throw this honey/combs away.

I'd do a classic C&S and not be worried a bit (this honey is not different than honey harvested from your hive or my hive).
The residue can be dried by the bees and then melted for wax.

Or just as well freeze as-is and use for bee emergency feeding - placing those honey combs directly onto the frames works great.

Any dry black combs can also used in swarm traps.
Some new beeks are begging for old black combs because they don't have any.
I did beg when I had nothing - no one shared with me, for shame.
 

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I do a ton of cutouts and often keep the honey for personal use. That said, if there is any possibility the hive got sprayed with pesticides, bag it and pitch it: not worth the risk. A common problem with cutout honey is insulation fibers, drywall dust, plaster bits, dead bees, etc... requiring a good straining. I use it to make mead sometimes. Use your judgement if you think it is food safe. if you want it de-crystalized, put the bucket in a box of some sort with an incandescent light bulb inside to warm it.
 

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That was my thought also. Not knowing why there are no longer bees is a red flag. Pesticides, brood diseases- just not worth the risk. Imagine bringing in EFB, almost as bad as a STD, a gift that keeps on giving.
 

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That was my thought also. Not knowing why there are no longer bees is a red flag. Pesticides, brood diseases- just not worth the risk. Imagine bringing in EFB, almost as bad as a STD, a gift that keeps on giving.
The OP indicated "no brood" - which tells me there were no signs of dead brood - a good thing as far as the brood infection.
No brood - no possible infection of that brood.

Obviously, if the cut-out was done out of the fiber glass cave and similar nasty location - no need to eat this honey.
If the presumed owner said "they sprayed the bees" - no need to harvest this honey.

The "bees dead" how?
Is it a dead winter cluster and only inside the cavity?
If so - the reasonably healthy bees just died over the winter and there is likely nothing wrong with the cavity contents to be reused.
If the dead bees are found outside of cavity - that tell me of the potential potential poisoning - bad thing.

Once the details are known, some conclusions can be made.

Really, without the context, no specific advice can be given; just some general ideas and nothing more to be expected.
A typical issue with such questions on BS when no details are provided whatsoever.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That was my thought also. Not knowing why there are no longer bees is a red flag. Pesticides, brood diseases- just not worth the risk. Imagine bringing in EFB, almost as bad as a STD, a gift that keeps on giving.
The OP indicated "no brood" - which tells me there were no signs of dead brood - a good thing as far as the brood infection.
No brood - no possible infection of that brood.

Obviously, if the cut-out was done out of the fiber glass cave and similar nasty location - no need to eat this honey.
If the presumed owner said "they sprayed the bees" - no need to harvest this honey.

The "bees dead" how?
Is it a dead winter cluster and only inside the cavity?
If so - the reasonably healthy bees just died over the winter and there is likely nothing wrong with the cavity contents to be reused.
If the dead bees are found outside of cavity - that tell me of the potential potential poisoning - bad thing.

Once the details are known, some conclusions can be made.

Really, without the context, no specific advice can be given; just some general ideas and nothing more to be expected.
A typical issue with such questions on BS when no details are provided whatsoever.
Yes there was no brood. There was no fiberglass they were in a wooden soffit. There were dead bees inside the cavity laying on the bottom part of the soffit. When I remove the bottom it rained down dead bees. No dead bees that I could see on the outsid. On the left in the picture I attached it looked like some comb that might鈥檝e been drawn towards the end of last year.
 

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That's the fun of this 馃槀. It's easy when it's not my problem. But anywho, I'll stand by my opinion.
 

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Unfortunately the bees are dead. They鈥檝e been gone for sometime because there was no evidence of brood eggs or anything. A lot of the honey is in darker comb and a lot of it seems to be crystallized. Not runny at all. We have had cold nights. Just not sure what to do with it.
A friend of mine makes mead with it.
 

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Maybe I am a little more cavalier about it. If I do not see any indications of pesticides or foul brood, I assume the feral colony died of mites and would consider the honey safe. Warming the comb will usually decrystalize it, or like Deb said, "make(s) mead with it".
 

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Looking at the picture of that old black comb....when it is so easy to produce honey from clean extracting combs I would not use any honey out of that for human consumption. I would solar melt all of it and sell the honey to my friend who feeds it to chickens.
 
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