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I have caught several swarms in the last couple of years, but I have never done a cut-out.

Any of you more experienced folks have a supply checklist that you use before heading out to do a cutout for someone?
 

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Knives to cut wall board and comb
Saws all to cut wall board (remember wires run inside the walls)
Step ladder or extension ladder
Boxes with open frames to put brood into
Rubber bands or yarn, to secure comb in frame

Folding table
Bee vac, if you make one your self make sure you can control the vacuum volume in the receiving compartment for the bees.
Extension cords
Smoker, lighter, fuel. Put you smoker on something metal to protect your table or the floor
Food grade plastic bags for honey comb.
Buckets, garbage bags.
Wet wipes, hand sanitizer, rubber glove one size bigger the what you wear
Paper towels
Bee suit gloves and a brave friend or wife or hubby.:)
 

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To add to the list, I also carry a queen clip and twist ties(garbage bag type) to twist tie the queen clip shut for the ride home.
Water in a five gallon bucket to keep your hands rinsed from dripping honey.
Thin flexible knife, I use an inexpensive fillet knife for cutting comb.
Ratchet straps to clamp the hive bodies together for the ride home.
Smoker just in case you need it and a way to haul it home so you don't burn up your vehicle.
Bee quick, or similar.

Joe
 

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Good points, I have a small trailer I haul the needed items and the hive boxes. Also add, duct tape to close off boxes.I also use it to secure the boxes. Ratchet strips are a must have.
Oh yea rope, if it is a second story job, to lower things out a window.
 

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I have caught several swarms in the last couple of years, but I have never done a cut-out.

Any of you more experienced folks have a supply checklist that you use before heading out to do a cutout for someone?
flashlight, pry bar, nails, screws, hammer, screwdriver. I like to also have with me #8 wire, steel wool, aluminum foil, tin snips, staple gun, plastic queen excluder. An old ice chest with a hinged lid is good to use for honey comb. A mechanic's stethoscope and a laser thermometer can be handy. Have fun.
 

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Bushkill and cutout screen
Supers with frames
Supers with foundationless
buckets
table
Hose pistol
extension cord
rubber bands
bee suits
rubber gloves
ladder
Wonder bars
Drill, bits, screws
Saws
trigger nozzle, hose
scrappers
cutout frames and staple gun
two 5 gallon buckets with lids- one for good honeycomb, the other for waste comb (trashbag works for this too)
preferred method of attaching brood comb to frames banana clips and zipties) rubber bands
good serrated edge knife for cutting down comb
smoker
bucket of soapy water for ongoing cleanup
several towel and washcloths'
bee brush
cutting tools for opening hive
plastic tarp to put everything on
powerful flashlight
a scope comes in handy for looking around without making a big opening.
sawhorses, plywood
 

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What do you use the nails and screws for???:scratch:
Minor repairs of exterior woodwork; occasionally, a cutout turns into a trapout; occasionally, we leave a swarm trap on location; occasionally, we decide while we're out to check a nearby swarm trap or trapout or rehive a swarm. Don't need them too often, but they don't take up much space, and they are nice to have when you need them.
 
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