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I've tried the Ross Rounds the past couple of years and I have hit or miss luck. Seems like the key is getting your hive close to swarm mode and don't use excluders. This seems to be working this year and they are bulding out. Due to my struggles with Ross Rounds I decided to also try regular cut comb.

My Issue is the actual foundation. I bought the right size foundation for the frames but as it warms up in the hive it starts to sag and eventually drops out. Am I supposed to use push pins on the ends of these to keep them in place? I'm assuming the answer is yes, but thought I would check with the experts.

Thanks
 

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My Issue is the actual foundation. I bought the right size foundation for the frames but as it warms up in the hive it starts to sag and eventually drops out. Am I supposed to use push pins on the ends of these to keep them in place? I'm assuming the answer is yes, but thought I would check with the experts.
I am NO expert but a comb honey new bee. I found that few if anyone or anything I read explains how to prepare the frames- and I too had the foundation just drop out not understanding why. Most everything I read talks about the condition of the colony and how to cut. You have to secure the comb in the frame some how depending on what type of frame you use. Hence, the little magic wax melting tool that drips and melts in the foundation to the frame groove- (hint I have since learned to use clean wax) or in my case, a small paint brush did the trick. Or you use slotted top frames which I will try next year. See MP's talk on the subject including these details on the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIjiInZRxrQ
Linda also has something on her website, this is the link to cutting, but she also has something on how to prepare the frames. http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com/2007/07/cutting-and-boxing-cut-comb-honey.html

The video is much more comprehensive and offers options.
I pulled my first 2 boxes of comb this year. Some is still wavy, but you have to start somewhere.
 

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kevina- Yes, use the push pins or cut hair clips cut in half, and insert thru side holes. A drop or two of wax on the
top bar doesn't hurt either if you want to go thru the work. Always make sure those bees are crowded too.
PS Are you using wedge top bars? You need to get those very tight. Also 5fr double deep nucs make for
great cut comb honey factories, did 500 comb one year off 20 nucs.
 

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You will have to use the melted wax tool to attach the foundation to the frame if you use thin surplus. You should also crowd the bees and put your cut comb supers on when they are flying like crazy, otherwise they won't fill them all the way up. Slotted top bars won't help a bit, you will need to attach the foundation in those, too. Otherwise, first warm day it fill fall out and make a mess.

Foundationless also works well, again only on a strong flow with plenty of bees. Best on a year like this one where they would fill anything you put on the hive in days!

Peter
 

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I either wax the surplus foundation into a grooved top bar with a wax tube fastener,which keeps it from falling out so easily or I use thin split top bars and fold the foundation over so it doesn't fall through. I also don't put the foundation in until I'm ready to put it on the hives. It sags quickly in hot weather.
 

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Kevin I have found the same thing with the foundation in suppers, then to top it off sometimes they chew it and make things worse.

No more foundation for me.


"foundationless never sags." I like that.
 
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