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Any permanent sensor will be rendered useless in due time by the bees......except weight and temp. O2 would be covered in an hour.
I have had a humidity sensor in the top of one of my hives for about 2.5 years and it has survived. I have it behind a piece of 1/8" hardware cloth and the bees have not managed to completely block it yet.

It started in a normal lid, and about a year in I moved it to a quilt box. They have not sealed the top of the quilt box yet, so I think the sensor is still reading about right. There are ways to protect the sensor, but you have to plan ahead and not leave the sensor exposed.
 

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I have had a humidity sensor in the top of one of my hives for about 2.5 years and it has survived. I have it behind a piece of 1/8" hardware cloth and the bees have not managed to completely block it yet.

It started in a normal lid, and about a year in I moved it to a quilt box. They have not sealed the top of the quilt box yet, so I think the sensor is still reading about right. There are ways to protect the sensor, but you have to plan ahead and not leave the sensor exposed.
this new hive they claim they have built has the sensors built into the hive. i picture these physically in the hive not as you described. of course they are short on any relevant details so we won't know their plan or lack there of.
 

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this new hive they claim they have built has the sensors built into the hive. i picture these physically in the hive not as you described. of course they are short on any relevant details so we won't know their plan or lack there of.
I am still waiting for more details. The original poster has not responded to this thread in a while so I am skeptical of what they are actually doing.
 

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I am still waiting for more details. The original poster has not responded to this thread in a while so I am skeptical of what they are actually doing.
That's my point with this and the other one. Hate to see a lot of new keepers waste money on pipe dreams and especially to have beesource be ravaged by shysters trying to tap into caring people's wallets.
 

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Kaizen and elmer_fud are spot on! This thread’s title did not appeal to me; it suggested a need for “crowd-funding” and I do not jump on those moving trains.

The subtle appearance of Moderator JWPalmer on August 16, 2019, appears to have ended the nebulous assertions starting with post#1. Thank you Beesource for monitoring these posts, and I encourage you to be proactive in protecting new beekeepers, and their wallets.
 

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And why do these threads suddenly have someone new defending the program acting like he is not involved?
I'm sorry, I may be new, but I was NOT defending the program !!
I was simply stating that things can and do change at a prototype level...

Please re-read what I said if you don't understand this .... Just because i'm wanting to experiment with sensors for myself also != being involved with his project .... I dont know the original poster from Adam ....

My goal if you really need to know since you clearly made huge dumb-ass assumptions and jump to unfounded and rather slanderous statements about myself, is that what I want to accomplish is an opensource system that anyone can build... Almost all of the stuff I see online, is $50-150 or even higher ... "Perfect" for someone who has a few hives, but totally impractical for 500-5000+ hives ...

Seriously, spending $24k-750k just on tech to monitor hive en mas is utter stupidity .... The sensors are cheap, and with the latest deep sleep current usage of parts you can really get some good monitoring with these parts with 1-2+ years on a single battery for a couple of $ (under $10) ...

And to put my 2c where my mouth is .... because i'm so "part of his project" "in it for the $$" "defending it" (puke), here is a data dump for those that want to DIY it now, if it aligns with my conclusions:

PS: My preliminary setup that I've been testing/want to test with, no battery life measurements yet, waiting for special gear to arrive ....
PSS: will post here the opensource site once i have actually measured power consumption and how long each circuit will last per battery... and finalized the designs ...

Reading a but load of scientific papers on monitoring bees, my PERSONAL distillation of the data shows that overall hive health can be monitored just by temperature. Weight can give you (if you know weight of your box layout) to a high degree total bees, how empty-full the box is = when to go harvest. Adding in frequency monitoring you can detect more status updates like stress, queen issues, swarming, however, from the conclusions from the papers, some of these variables are "generic" but many are per hive, so this is the last thing I would tackle ...

Working - Hive health monitoring via temperature sensor:
1x esp8266 with adaptor plate - $2.50 - ebay
1x MCP1702-3302E voltage regulator - $0.65 - ebay (bulk)
2x capacitor - few cents - ebay
2x resistors - few cents - ebay (voltage divider to monitor battery voltage
1x DS18B20 - $0.55 - ebay (bulk) - You can buy the "water proof ones" for more - has extension to insert into hive in center if you wish - calibrate as per thecavepearlproject.org
1x 18650 battery holder - $0.32 - ebay (bulk)
1x 18650 SAMSUNG 29E 18650 2.75A - $3.50 - liionwholesale

Total: $7.72

3D Print a waterproof housing - or buy a waterproof housing on ebay for around $1

Should end up being under $10

Use ESP Now to send data to master node
of-things.de battery life calculator says 1145 days (3.1 years) with 10% discharge safety

Add weight sensor (waiting for parts)
above setup + weight sensor depending on how you want to deploy it
200kg (440lbs) bar weight sensor is around $12
Dual setup ($24) + mounting system ($10-15?) for a total? of $35-40 and should give you 400kg (880lbs) weight monitoring.. Overkill, yes, but should greatly reduce drifting (to be tested)
Pick a number between 5-25% of your hives and add weight sensors to it

Master node (waiting for parts for solar version, current version is mains powered)
Similar setup as above but with charge controller and small solar panel, or, ESP32 as it has built in clock and other really nifty bonus features, plan to test out both master nodes and give both as options depending on your needs...

Receives the signal and passes it on to wherever you want to process it.

Connection options include:
GPS with antenna - $3.62 - ebay - For exact time when sending data, plot exact location if needed, etc - alternative is RTC for about $1.50 if using esp8266
GSM module from $1.45 - ebay
Lorawan module from $3 - ebay - here I would recommend you setup your own private lorawan system (sending limit is then per FTC rules and not Lorawan rules) and receivers. You can build a receiver for around $20-30 ... put down some cash for decent antennas and you can go more than the 5-7km (3-4.3 miles) and get insane distances. Bonus here is no gsm data bundles required, and may be able to cover all your bee yards.
Another esp32/esp8266 connected to your local network if all your boxes are at/near your home


Frequency monitoring addon
Probably same core as health node - but probably requires an ESP32 ($4 +/-)
Sound sensor - $0.74 - ebay
Processing sound DRASTICALLY increases power consumption. Back of the envelope calculations show that recording for 10s, averaging to get current frequency detected, every hour from 6am to 6pm only yields potential 308 days on the above battery.
You would probably need something like a raspberry pi zero W as a mini data processing server on site for around $40-50 solar powered to process the audio data.. To be tested way further down the line...

Handle the data however you want, this is all opensource (much of all this is all out there already, just making "my version" as cost effective as possible seeing as deployment will eventually be on 1000's of hives, so if it all averages out to be around $15 per hive, with 10% weight sensors, 500-5000 hives would only cost $7.5k - $75k vs 5 to 10/20 times as much) and kinda pie in the sky (but rather sound) till I get everything documented with actual testing and run-times ...

To post creator: I apologies if i'm raining on your parade...
To kaizen: Assumption is the mother of all ****ups .... learn something here ....
 

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Smart...stuff...Hive
Sounds like you are targeting backyard-two-hive-keepers. But those folks have already spent their hobby budget on Flow hive and now have a pissed off spouse who won't let them buy any more "ridiculous gadgets".

Outside of that group, you'll need to launch your product in $50/hive range, to be viable. Why $50? Because that's what it takes to outfit a resource nuc which provides a lot more value than all that tech and sensors.

Not trying to be negative, just being realistic.
 
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