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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have any experience moving hives across state lines?
We may be moving from Raleigh to Panama City and we don't want to let the girls convey with the house, especially since we just split into two.
Thanks,
Ed.
 

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Call your State inspector and have him give you a bill of good health and let him know you are moving. He will put an inspection sticker on the hive and/or give you a piece of paper as well (at least that's how it works in my state). Once you arrive to your new location register your hives in that state and provide your inspector with the previous inspection report. Or you can do it the illegal way, just pack'em up and go bout your business. Your choice.
 

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If they chase you down in Florida, which they do regularly. You better have paperwork or you could be walking to your court appearance. You will not be allowed to continue, even to correct the condition, until they are satisfied. I have bypassed the station carrying nothing and they can still ticket you. Bees come to Florida all the time and so do the diseases, pests and parasites. They are very aggressive to prevent bringing in more bad guys.
 

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if they are ticketing you and you are carrying nothing, it sounds more like they are out to fill their coffers for anything they can find or make up if need be.
 

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If you have a closed trailer, rental truck, or look like you are moving across the state line you must stop or you will get their attention. When you go across the station they usually do not care. If you bypass you get a roadside inspection. When they leave the comfort of their air conditioning they will find something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Guys. I will check with both the Extention Office here and in Fla.

The real question was, How to secure them for transport. My biggest problem is the amount of bearding my girls do. I have several thousand hangin out all night long so, sealing up the entrance at night is futile.

Maybe a bee vac. would work. But, I was recently in the hive at about 7:30PM and they were not very welcoming.

Thanks,
Ed.
 

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from what I have seen and read, I would not close them up. It would be too hot for them. I believe they make a net to go over the hives for transporting.

I may be off base on all this. I am sure someone else with more know how will chime in
 

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Do not close them up unless you like baked bees. Do what commercial beeks do. Get a mesh tarp, like from Northern Tool or maybe Harbor Freight less than $30, cover the hive. Tuck it under the edges or tie it so it will not blow off at 55 or 80 whatever you are doing. Do not stop longer than fuel, food or fast breaks. Try to park in the shade. If you carry a new (never used for chemicals), clean spray bottle mist them down with water any time you stop. The Ag Inspectors might check for a tarp. I used to carry without and it could be considered liably reckless. Don't ask me how I know not to bypass inspection stations or carry hives untarped. I travel I95 and I85 frequently. The wife really hates if I have a bunch of hives in the sleeper and the A/C. I am waiting for a trooper to see bees in the cab. I might get away with flying down the highway. Passing cars sure look in amazement and swerve in my lane.
 

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The ag inspectors check for one thing..PAPERWORK.. The only reason for the paperwork is money. I've driven dozens of semi loads from GA to FL with no nets. To prove a point once I handed them my fire ant cert from 2 months earlier and they glanced at it and handed it back. The process is not nearly as complicated as people would like to believe. Get a moving screen for the top, staple a screen over the entrance, and duct tape any other holes or cracks. If your afraid of over heating give them and extra box with empty combs to spread out into. When moving bees back to MI we often give them an empty brood on the bottem.
 

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Screened bottom boards and screened top is a good idea. Last time I moved bees from one state to another was in August. Prepared the hives the day before, slept all day, loaded them at sunset, covered the load of 16 hives with a large mosquite net material, and drove all night and into the next day. Yes, they were out of their boxes and not really enjoying the ride. When I got to their new location, I removed the net, let them adjust. A day or two later, unloaded them in their new location.
Good luck on your move.
 
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