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There's a comment made on the "eyelet" thread wondering about cross wiring. As others have mentioned, there is no real need to cross wire medium wired foundation.

However, the great advantages of cross wiring deep wired foundation are several. First, as the bees cluster on the foundation to start drawing the foundation into comb, without cross wires the foundation can sag. Thus the cells will be deeper on one side, compared to the other. That limits their use for brood. Looked at from the end, the midrib of the comb would look something like this: ( That is exaggerated a bit, but don't ask me how I know! LOLOL I tried going without wire, then I tried those push pins that straddled the foundation, and finally realized there wasn't any shortcut to wiring. Unless I went to plastics, and I didn't want to do that.

Second, never say never. You just never know when you might, for one reason or another, want to extract a deep frame.

Third, if a hive gets hot, and the bees have difficulty for some reason or other keeping the optimum temperature inside, weight of honey and pollen stored on one side of a comb could cause sagging. Particularly before the bees get the ends of the foundation anchored to the end bars.
Regards,
Steven
 

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Mediums should also be cross wired, even if the foundation has vertical crimp wires. This will keep the foundation centered in the frame so that as Steven says, you won't have two depths of cells . It also supports the comb when extracting. The vertical wires keep the comb from sagging downward, creating odd size cells as a result, that won't be used for brood.

One way to avoid eyeletting is to shoot two nails or brads through each end bar, then bend the ends to make hooks. Wire so that there are two horizontals with a big X in the center. This will also strengthen the frame. When all done, you can curl one of the nails a little more to make it tight. You'll need to make a special tool, something with a round shank and a slot cut in the end to make a tight "J" at the end of the nail, like a screwdriver with the end cut off.
 

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then I tried those push pins that straddled the foundation,
A club member told me about using bobby pins in lieu of those push pins." They work great and are cheap at the everything's a dollar store. Bees just build comb over the pins like they do the other pins or wires. Doesn't beat crosswiring but helps center vertical wired foundation in the frame.


Pete0
Bena, VA
 

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If I cross wired I belive I would use the fishing line rather than floss simply because I think the bees may chew it out. :scratch:
 

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Bee kinda have a habbit of removeing anything that dosent belong in the hive, if you have ever tied comb in a frame or used rubberbands in a few days it is gone.
 

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If you have ever used string or rubber bands to hold comb in frames, you will remember that the bees will leave that stuff for you on the landing board at some point.:)
 

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the bees will leave that stuff for you on the landing board at some point.:)
Yes just like the news paper from a combine :cool:
 

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What a great walk down memory lane!

Yep, I've done the fishing line, rubber bands, band aids, bobby pins, push pins, no pins, no wires.

In the long run, all my efforts kept bringing me back to cross wires. So I cross wire everything, brood, medium and shallows. I got into the habit because of my two-frame, tangiental extractor blew out all their hard work. I still do it even though I've graduated to a radial extractor.

Wiring may take a little more work, but I'm going to do it. Can't hurt, probably helps.

Grant
Jackson, MO (headed to Orlando and the ABF convention on Wednesday!)
 
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