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crofter & psm1212 "Honey Creamer tool " & "When you get into travelling wall scrapers it immediately gets out of the realm of hobby process controls!"

What about an ice cream maker? Manual or elctric drive will work :) Check out Immergood ( AMish) as the WHite Mountain Ice Cream CO., here in RI, is apparently having problems with supply / COVID-19 - problem unknown.
Would the honey be too thick for the ICE cream maker. worth a try, if buying I may pick the manual, and try small batches, Seems to me the honey would kill the motor.

GG
 

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GG " Seems to me the honey would kill the motor." That is a major consideration but manageable I am guessing. My first goal is to cool honey form 145F to 75 F to add "seed". The issue to be solved here it s the formation of a thick boundary layer of viscous honey on the cold wall - same problem in ice cream making. Ice cream makers have a scraper stirrer design and counter rotating designs. Plus it is a simple setup for small quantities. So heating will be easy, cooling the liquid to 75F without adding a lot of air appears very doable, adding seed and mixing is easy - no salt needed, just some ice.

Now the question is while holding the liquid at 57F +/- can we continue to stir until crystalized in the bucket to make a softer crystalized honey liek soft butter, or the motor's thermal swtich cuts in and shuts off the motor. The "good" motors are 12000RPM and geared down but do die. A technical issue that can be solved, hydraulic motor, DC motor - it is a torque and windings cooling issue.

If left in the bucket we need to scoop it out to pack it - maybe extrude it. I think cooling it to 75 , adding seed crystals and bottling it and then storing at 57F for 4 to xx days is the easier way for now. If a softer creamed honey is created as expected with constant, slow stirring then hand packing works for me. More discussion needed? I am big on trial and error to learn.

Having a good, large opening bottle with a hermetic seal is an issue. Got ideas? I am thinking Bell jars.

Just had another idea - timed - pulse stirring which will reduce the heating load on the motor.
 

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Bread makers have the speed and torque that might lend itself to power stirring of honey. Their drive system coupling method would lend itself to powering scraper/ paddles. I have a Kuradori that gets used hundreds of times a year.

I dont know how hard it would be to get into its programming but I am sure there would be a way to pick its brain or bypass it. I believe its drive system uses a cogged belt and those belts and sprockets are shelf available in wide range of lengths and tooth count. Silicone kitchen tools could be repurposed for scraping paddles similar to a mortar mixer configuration.

The kitchen aid mixer would could also be harnessed in some fashion too.
 

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cooling just wait a day it will cool
extrude interesting, I intend to just scoop and pack , but I am doing a couple gallons.
I may try to find a plastic or stainless paint stirrer, for my drill.
The stir till crystalized could be a while , weeks, I think stir well package store in the cool place.

So give it a try and let us know how it goes, Mine will have a twist, "flavored" with something....

GG
 

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Not sure if I read something to this affect or it is just my mental meandering, but I think there may be something about stirring as the crystallization progresses to prevent the process becoming waves that push the rejected water ahead of it instead of being micro mixed. There have been quite a few threads about white streaks occurring in honey that crystallizes without agitation. My bet is that if you spot analyzed those areas you would find moisture level transients. If evenly dispersed throughout the product, the spot discrepancies in moisture levels may remain tolerable.
 

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Some of honeys naturally thicken to the creamed honey state.
Here is one such jar - just like soft butter.
Delicious.
Maybe I will go and get another spoon.
20200825_110506.jpg

Yes, I recycle a lot of jars.
:)
 

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What about an ice cream maker?
Dyce used an ice-cream freezer to test the theory that paddles slowly scraping the sides of a jacketed tank would cool honey more quickly. A gallon of honey was heated to 150F and placed in the ice cream freezer packed with ice and salt and turned at 35 rpm for 5 minutes. Honey temperature dropped from 150F to 70F. He then repeated the test, but removed the paddles from the machine which scrapped the inside walls of the churn. He turned the the churn for 5 minutes and the honey dropped from 150F to 100F. For his third test, he removed the ice and salt and ran the test pouring 52F water into the barrel that contained the freezer and turned it with no paddles for 5 minutes. This resulted in dropping the temp from 150F to 110F. The last test was identical to the third test, except the paddles were reinstalled. This dropped the temp from 150F to 72F.
 

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Having a good, large opening bottle with a hermetic seal is an issue. Got ideas? I am thinking Bell jars.
In no case did the samples closed by vacuum excel the hermetically sealed samples in keeping quality, but honey sealed by both these methods
excelled the samples placed in glass containers and in friction-top tins. It is therefore desirable to place honey in air-tight containers. Since
the vacuum seal is more costly than the hermetic seal, it is desirable to choose the latter method for packing honey.
- Elton J. Dyce
 
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