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Hi all,

For a few years, we've been producing a soft, smooth, creamed honey from the prairie canola honey we harvest. It stays soft and spreadable, and once people taste it, they are hooked, and come back for more and more and more.

We now have honey on a few store shelves, and the creamed honey does not seem to be selling as well in the stores as from the farm-gate. I am wondering whether the customers see the white "creamed" honey and visualize hard, granulated honey. I have been toying around with adding something to the label to let the customers know what creamed honey is. In the past, we used to have a sticker on the lid saying "Creamed Honey", but it didn't look very nice, and customers got the wrong impression. I would like to include something that would still say that honey is pure, unprocessed, and soft and spreadable. I have gotten some ideas, but not any good ones:

Adding "Creamed" - customers I've spoken to get ideas of cream being added to the honey

"Homogenized" - a term used in Europe for a similar texture, however, I feel this term has connotations of "processed/factory" etc.

"Stirred to remain soft and spreadable" - lengthy...

Any ideas?

Thanks
 

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Technically it is Processed. You took it out of the original state.
Def: Unprocessed - unaltered from an original or natural state; not processed

I think that when you sell it from a Store people think that it is from a Food Plant and not as good.
When they buy it from the Farm store they think it came form the store and it is wholesome and yummy.

Kinda like Farmers markets. Many bring in food that is not from them (fruits/Veggies) and when the Market Managers allow that it ruins it for all because it is a Lie. But then again I like FM for the small guy, not the guy that has a Brick and Morter store.
 

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Jonathan, once you have honey on a 'retail store' shelf, you are likely competing with other honey producer's products in the same store. And its tough to tell a convincing story in the space available on a jar label.

But, you can provide a link to your marketing story on a website. And if you make it easy for shoppers to get to your website (use a QR barcode that a smartphone can read 'on the spot' & translate into a website URL), you can provide pretty much anything. Of course, you need to set up the website content as well.

In your case, I expect that you would want to emphasize your "farm roots" (rather than a food manufacturer). Take a look at this site to get some ideas: http://www.queenbrishoney.com/queen-bri-local-honey-okc/

I have no connection with those folks, but find it an interesting example. And no, I didn't see anything about QR codes there. :)
 

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No experience marketing, but as a consumer, I like the words spun,spreadable and creamed. I know space is an issue on the label, but maybe "spreadable creamed honey"? If creamed is no good, "spreadable spun honey"? Spun has a good homey ring to it. If you are dealing with small stores, maybe they will allow a small display or cards explaining it?
When I offer honey to friends and ask if they want some honey to take home (which they always do) I ask if they like liquid or spreadable. After I explain it, they like the concept of it being spreadable/less mess. So, people def like it when they know what you mean. Now they ask for the spreadable when I offer some. I even have a friend asking for more fermented, although that was an embarrassing mistake. J
 

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SMOOTH, SPREADABLE HONEY

Pure honey, no added ingredients
 

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Johnathan;

How many pounds of this honey do you convert in a season? Are you using your own canola honey for seed?
 

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We have used our own honey for seed for many years now. I don't know off-hand how many pounds we usually cream, but I would say it is from 2/3 to 3/4 of our crop.
 

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hello, if I may ask:
We're creaming honey by whipping it.
I've heard that there's a method to ROLL the honey using rollers and crushing the crystal smooth.
Can I buy this machine anywhere?
 

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Funny, I must be only one out of millions that liked the 'creamed honey' that Trader Joe's use to sell. I always wondered if they whipped some bees wax into it somehow, as it usually was hard. Not super hard, but really firm, I'd scoop it out of the container with a spoon and use it in my coffee/tea. The Trader Joe's 'creamed honey' was the first I'd purchased in ages, I had purchased a 'creamed honey' from a grocery store, but it was soft and runny, didn't like it. Now Trader Joe's does not have it any more, as their 'creamed honey' is soft and runny. Don't need it anyway, as I have my own honey, but that solid creamed honey was good for traveling.
 

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If I recall correctly, that was Brayshaw's Creamed Honey available from Trader Joe's, at least in my area. I could hardly ever resist buying it.

The hardness / softness ("spreadability?") seems to depend on the temperature over the last 45 minutes or so. Hard when cold, runny when warm.

You might include a line like, "THE BEST honey to put on a peanut butter and honey sandwich!"
 

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I sold roughly 40 cases of creamed honey this year (9 oz jars). While I did not put it on the label, I have a display card that describes it as "Silky," "Smooth" and "Spreadable." Creamed honey is not a very well-known entity in the southeastern U. S. so you have to educate your buyers as best you can. That is hard to do on a grocery store shelf. Much easier at farmer's market type venues where a big "Creamed Honey" sign will get people asking you all day "What is Creamed Honey?" Those people usually buy a jar.

Once you get a customer base and demand established, you will not be able to make enough.
 
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