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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A pleasant surprise:

About 35 years ago my father obtained a used Craftsman radial arm saw, model 113.19771. In its early days with my father it was kept in a shed, but for these past 30 years, or so, it was basically kept outside, laying on its side, atop a pile of brushy firewood. When my father obtained it, it had been functional, but needed a new table and fence, before it would have been usable. So, my father never actually got around to repairing it, so he never used it.

I recently rescued it from the woodpile at my father's place, but assumed it was only good for scrap, but I had a glimmer of hope that I might be able to rescue it, or at least part of it. So, it has been on a woodpile at my place for a few years. Yesterday, I pulled it off the woodpile and set it on an empty deep super. It had a HSS blade that was solidly rusted together with the arbor, nut, and support discs. The cords were almost without degradation. So I risked plugging it in and turning it on. Wow, was I surprised when I flipped the switch and it whirred to life, like it had last been used, just yesterday.

After that surprise, I unplugged it, downloaded a PDF of its manual, to familiarize myself with the parts and operations of its various components. I lubricated the moving parts that were still movable. Using some lube and a propane torch to heat the arbor nut (once heated it was easy to remove the old blade and replace it with an 80 tooth, carbide finishing/cutoff blade). I still need to check out all the other necessary components, clean and lubricate the entire saw. Then build and install a table and fence - adjust and calibrate it. In another week, maybe less, I plan to use it for most, if not all of my crosscuts - if I don't discover any unforeseen issues.
 

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I have a 113 series Craftsman radial saw that I quit using because of guard safety issues, I can't remember the place online but you can contact them and they will send you a new table top and new guards for the saw for free. I'll see if I can find the website but all you have to do is type in the serial number and they will tell you if your saw qualifies.

Butch

Update

I think this is the website.
http://www.radialarmsawrecall.com/
 

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I'm jelous of you guys.I took the roller bearings out of my dewalt R.A.Saw a few weeks ago..
luckily I had all my boxes cut for this year. To much use in sub zero temps in my un-heated
shop..I'll fix it when its warmer, meanwhile I bought a bottom of the line table saw for $100..
Old RAS's are cheap but you probably have to spend some bucks to get them back into shape
but their worth it..:)

==McBee7==
 

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That green saw looks like a DeWalt my father owned from back in pre-history. His model was under-powered, so he bought a used Craftsman that I always considered to be his "new" radial arm saw.

I went with him when he picked it up. The fellow we bought it from was rather conspicuously missing two fingers on one hand. I've been terrified of the saw ever since. Mind you, I use it. If you are not terrified of that whirling blade, you are not thinking clearly. Regardless of the number of guards or the quickness of the brake, if it is not dangerous it doesn't work.

We loaned it to a friend for an extended time. That friend experienced a severe finger injury from a planer, but did OK with the saw.

We had a period of time when it needed to be outdoors, covered with a tarp when not in use. It stayed that way for about 2 1/2 years, and pulled through.

I've since found my saw as the "cover-girl" on a 1959 Craftsman catalog, so I'm guessing that's its vintage. I used to do contract work for the CPSC, and one day noticed a whole section of recalls on radial arm saws, with mine among them. The whole issue is guards and brakes. Mine only brakes with a manual knob on one end of the motor, and the guards are basic and not automatic. But when I contacted Sears about the recall terms, they said "It is old. Get rid of it and get a new one."

I still use it. And I'm still terrified of it. That terror is undoubtedly why it has not hurt me. Yet.
 

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Be careful of the carriage bearings on older RAS. On some models, if they fail the whole carriage drops onto the table. I sent the motor off of my dad's old Craftsman to Emerson for the $100 rebate. I have two Delta 12" RAS and a Delta 14". None see much use except for crosscutting occasionally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have a 113 series Craftsman radial saw that I quit using because of guard safety issues, I can't remember the place online but you can contact them and they will send you a new table top and new guards for the saw for free. I'll see if I can find the website but all you have to do is type in the serial number and they will tell you if your saw qualifies.

Butch

Update

I think this is the website.
http://www.radialarmsawrecall.com/
Thanks Butch,
I ordered the new guard and table top replacement kit from Emerson. It's supposed to take 8-10 weeks to receive, but apparently costs me nothing, even for shipping. Now I only need to wait a few more weeks before I can use it, but it should be as safe as possible, once the new parts are installed. Sure am glad I heard about this, before I even started to create a replacement table top. Excellent tip - thanks again.
 

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Glad I could be some help. If I can remember I don't think it took that long to receive the kit, I thought that was going to take forever but what did I have to lose if I never received anything but I did receive it.

Butch
 

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I have 2 10" RAS's.

One is a 'Sawsmith' ...a companion to the shopsmith. It has a similar variable speed control to the Mark V (sheaves), can mount a blade on either side of the motor to best use the table when making angled cuts, and sturdy. I also have a bracket that will allow it to drive the Shopsmith accessories.

The other is a Delta/Rockwell turret head from '65 I believe. This is a big, heavy, massive arm that can swivel from the center of the arm rather than rotating around the base.

I like using both, and yes, always give them plenty of respect.

deknow
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm anxious to get the kit, so I can finish refurbishing this RAS and put it to use making most of my cross cuts. I used to use a RAS in woodworking shops where I've done woodworking in the past, shops other than my own. And I greatly appreciate being able to move the blade through the stock, rather than push the stock through the blade. I'm not sure if I'll use it for ripping, or any other cuts, but I'm fairly confident I can be safe if I'm very careful with that use.

My father also had a Shopsmith (I think it was a mark V, it had the color scheme common on the 1960 to 1963 anniversary version), when I was still a teenager, which I remember he had brought it with him to California, then later took it back to Ohio on a summer trip, then he traded it to my grandfather (his father-in-law). I don't know what the trade was about, but the last time I saw it, it was in my grandfather's basement in Ohio, when I was visiting there one summer. The last visit, before my grandfather passed away. I never did find out where it got to. I would have liked to play with that one, a bit, too.
 

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I have a 113-23100 and love it. I use it for cross cuts and to spin a dado pack.

DSC00646.jpg

Made in June '74

I don't know about the recall, it sounds like if you can retro fit their blade guard, all is good, otherwise you send them your carriage and they send you $100 and you're left with scrap to take to the recycling center. The saw is dangerous, it took the tip off my work glove while I was aligning some stock... I'm certainly not trading the saw for a few bucks, it's too valuable to me. I will, however, contact the recall customer support to see exactly what will happen once a person sends them their carriage as mine falls under the

"There is no kit available for your saw, however you can order a Return Box for the option of turning in your saw for $100. Please contact our customer service number at (800) 511-2628."

From their website:

These saws were sold without a guard that covers the entire blade. Some consumers have contacted the blade or have been hit by wood kicked back by the saws, resulting in amputations, fractures and lacerations. :eek::cry:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, today I continued to clean and examine this saw, comparing it to the manual, learning the adjustment sequence. Uh oh, for some reason, unknown, the previous owner somehow lost or failed to install several essential parts, necessary to the correct operation of this saw. The, motor cam and the bevel lock lever, both used when rotating the motor, where the blade alignment angle is changed from perfectly vertical to horizontal and angles in between. Also the index pin assembly, for the same system is frozen - I will, most likely be able to remedy its condition (though not bring the saw to full functionality), but the two essential, missing parts, seem to be unavailable (no longer produced by the manufacturer). It looks like I will need to find a way to, somehow adjust the saw so that it will be aligned to accurately perform cross cut operations, despite the missing components - I wasn't planning on using it for any bevel cuts, anyway.

Another possible option: I noticed on the Craftsman forum that some guys in situations similar to mine, have managed to obtain additional saws, of the same models (for a reasonable price), and to assemble at least one complete and functional unit with parts from multiple units.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Well, the outcome was not as serious as I had first expected. I substituted the motor cam with a rubber hose washer in combination with a fender washer - this combination looks like it will make it possible to make any alignment adjustments, necessary. And, since the bevel lock lever is missing, I can just loosen the bolts, enough to permit the motor to rotate, then tighten them when the desired bevel angel is reached, to set it. Unfortunately the lever, in the same assembly that is supposed to control the bevel index pin that locks the bevel angle to a few preset angles, is frozen (with the pin in retracted position - fortunately). Due to it's design, I'm guessing that moisture, over time, corroded the spring, so its remains immobilized the index pin, in its present position. I've added penetrating oil, and tapped and wiggled the pin and lever, but so far, the pin hasn't loosened up. That assembly appears to be in a channel partially cast into the motor carriage, and partially drilled through the motor carriage, so I need to be cautious or I could, unintentionally, do irreparable harm to the motor carriage housing. So, I'm going to leave it alone, for now. Perhaps it will work free, over time. But, I'd better leave well enough alone, especially since it is functional the way it is - though just not as easily, without the added functionality of those missing parts, and the one assembly that is presently not functioning (the bevel index pin).

- - - -
My brother is an aircraft mechanic, who used to work for Boeing, but now is freelance. He is going to make me a set of custom arbor wrenches for each of my power tools that use them. I'm planning to tether each set to their tool. I always seem to misplace them, eventually, then can't locate them whenever I do need to change blades or bits.

And, BTW, Craigs List shows one of this same model, for sale, just about an hour North of me. It is listed as already having the recall kit installed, and to be completely functional, in very good condition. For only $250. I think I'll get by just fine, with mine; but if they would take $100, for it, I'd give it more thought.
 

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They send you a table and guards for the recall? I'm pretty sure that's the same saw I have at home. I'll check the serial number when I get home.
 

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Our Craftsman Radial Arm Saw took a dive off of the trailer on its way home at about 60. Busted the table and some other parts. We made a new table out of plywood and squared it up, it does a fair job now. I use the sliding miter saw for shorter boards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The kit arrived yesterday, it included new mounting rails for the table, three pieces for the table (I had to provide my own piece of lumber for the "fence", which fits between the main table piece and the two smaller pieces in the back. A piece to mount to the motor, that helps to hold the new guard in place, and a new handle with a bar that will lift the bottom section of the guard, if desired, during a cut (especially helpful when crosscutting). Since I don't have the actual arbor wrenches, but ordinary box wrenches that fit the arbor, and arbor nut, it was somewhat difficult to install the blade and tighten the arbor nut (the new guard surrounds the blade very closely), but I did manage to do so. I also had to obtain a few bolts, washers, and nuts, since the original table mounting hardware had long since been lost. The manual listed the necessary hardware and where and how to install it. Five bolts, with nuts and washers, then one set screw, to use with the T-nut provided (to level the table center).

I also fastened a piece of 1/2" MDF, with six coated deck screws, that completely covers the surface of the main table section. With the blade adjusted to just touch the surface of this sacrificial table, when it is pushed behind the fence board, it rides about 1/2" above the back two pieces of the table, protecting them from contacting the blade.

I already put it to use, I crosscut a ten foot long, 2" x 10" of Douglas Fir, into 19" long pieces for Top Bar blanks. The 80 tooth carbide finishing blade made nice, smooth, cuts.
 
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