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I was given a starter for Amish Friendship bread, so you would need to make one with either yeast or non-yeast, you can google it (how to make starter for Amish Fr. Br.)
AMISH FRIENDSHIP BREAD
With the starter add: 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk; mix well and divvy it up between 4 gallon sized baggies. Give three away with these directions and keep one starter. It should get bubbly and ferment, thicken up; push out air bubbles, don’t refrigerate.
Day 1: leave on your counter
Day 2: squeeze bag several times throughout day
Day 3: same
Day 4: same
Day 5: add 1 c. flour, 1 c. sugar, 1 c. milk, squish around to mix mostly smooth
Day 6: squeeze bag several times throughout day
Day 7: same
Day 8: same
Day 9: same
Day 10: in a non-metal bowl mix with non metal spoon mix in 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk; pour 4 one cup starters into one gallon baggies and give away with these directions. To the remaining batter in the bowl add:

1 cup canola oil (use less its ok)
1 tsp vanilla
½ cup milk
3 eggs
½ tsp baking soda
2 tsp cinnamon
1 cup sugar
½ tsp salt
1 ½ tsp baking powder
2 cups flour
2 smallboxes of instant vanilla pudding
* you can add raisens, nuts, figs, dates, etc
Grease bread pan(s) (sprinkle with cinnamon/sugar if you want) pour in batter Bake loaves @325* about an hour or until a tester comes out clean

Dont forget to save a cup of starter for yourself to make again in 10 days!
 

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Just saw this thread. I haven't been able to get yeast at the supermarket in weeks. I started a sourdough starter for the first time and on my fourth day. It's going great and I'll be baking with it tomorrow. Wish me luck.

Jon
 

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Jon, good luck.

FYI, I have not bought yeast for 2-3 years at the least. It is not needed. Just another commercial invention to sell.
 

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For those that do find commercial yeast useful, I recommend buying by one pound packages (or 2 single 'pound' packages bundled together). Put a small quantity of yeast in a small jar, and store that in the refrigerator. Put the bulk of the package (tightly wrapped) in the freezer, and reload the small refrigerator jar as needed. Yeast in a freezer keeps very well, I have used some years after buying the package.

A pound of yeast is pretty cheap. Try Sam's, Costco, Amazon, even some "Amish" stores carry it. I generally find it for less than $10 / pound.
 

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That is amazing. Never thought I'd get a sourdough starter lesson here. LOL - My approach to beekeeping is like your approach to starter - set it and forget it. Bees know better than me what they need.

Funny I came across this because I had some extra proofed yeast and decided to try a starter with some rye flour a couple of weeks ago. The only thing I didn't do was refrigerate it so not sure it's any good at this point. I'm like you, I don't like the "throw 1/2 it out" part. So glad you shared your recipe and pic's.

From what it looks like, you have about 1 cup of starter you dump in your 5c of flour along with grains and let it do its thing. Meanwhile, without cleaning the starter jar, you just add 1/4c rye flour & 1/4 c water. Somewhere along the line you add more to it so it's about 1 c of sponginess and then refrigerate it?

I'll see if my starter is salvageable, if not I'll get a bigger jar with a tight fitting lid and give this a go. If this works at least I'll be able to get by w/o yeast (which has become impossible to get). At the rate we're going I need to order whole grains and mill it myself (not easy to find). Otherwise, I might try to grow my own wheat, oats and rye. Thank you for the lesson.
 

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While I do have a KitchenAid 6qt mixer, an inexpensive alternative that I use more often is a bread machine from a 2nd-hand store. I pay around $8-$12 for bread machines at a local Habitat For Humanity resale store. I use them until they quit, then get out another from my stash.:)

I don't like having a 'paddle' hole in the middle of my bread, plus I prefer a traditional loaf shape. My solution is to simply transfer the dough from the bread machine into a regular loaf pan after the machine has done the 1st rise. The final rise is in the Pyrex loaf pan and then it gets baked in a regular oven.

One advantage of the bread machine over a mixer is that the bread machine has programmed in 'wait' cycles that allow the dough to rest for certain intervals. If I was using a mixer, I'd need to remember:rolleyes: to get back to that task after a bit. The bread machine means I only need to come back to it for the dough transfer into the loaf pan. But I do use the timer on my phone to remind me to do that.
I do this sometimes, too. It also lets you easily make pizza dough, rolls, etc in the oven. The timed cycle for no-baking in machine saves a lot of "**** I forgot I was doing that."
 

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That is amazing. Never thought I'd get a sourdough starter lesson here. LOL - My approach to beekeeping is like your approach to starter - set it and forget it. Bees know better than me what they need.

Funny I came across this because I had some extra proofed yeast and decided to try a starter with some rye flour a couple of weeks ago. The only thing I didn't do was refrigerate it so not sure it's any good at this point. I'm like you, I don't like the "throw 1/2 it out" part. So glad you shared your recipe and pic's.

From what it looks like, you have about 1 cup of starter you dump in your 5c of flour along with grains and let it do its thing. Meanwhile, without cleaning the starter jar, you just add 1/4c rye flour & 1/4 c water. Somewhere along the line you add more to it so it's about 1 c of sponginess and then refrigerate it?

I'll see if my starter is salvageable, if not I'll get a bigger jar with a tight fitting lid and give this a go. If this works at least I'll be able to get by w/o yeast (which has become impossible to get). At the rate we're going I need to order whole grains and mill it myself (not easy to find). Otherwise, I might try to grow my own wheat, oats and rye. Thank you for the lesson.
Sounds like this is largely addressed to me. So I presume. :)

The starter based on rough rye flour and water is, indeed, set-it-and-forget-it type.
It is slow and steady and does not require attention by the hour.
Initially, I tried to replicate this website:
https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/rye-sourdough-starter-in-easy-steps/

I was about 3-4 years ago now; don't remember anymore.
Since then I tossed away all the complications and don't follow any hard rules anymore.
The process gotta be so stupidly simple, you should never mess with measuring and timing anything (as the peasants never did).

From what it looks like, you have about 1 cup of starter you dump in your 5c of flour along with grains and let it do its thing. Meanwhile, without cleaning the starter jar, you just add 1/4c rye flour & 1/4 c water. Somewhere along the line you add more to it so it's about 1 c of sponginess and then refrigerate it?
Exactly.
You just nailed it.
This has been my SOP - except I don't even measure anything anymore.
I only target to get the "thick paste" consistency when I mix flour and water - totally by eye.
But yes - it is about 1 c of ready starter sponge when I use it up for next baking.
Don't need more than that.

I hate the "throw 1/2 it out" idea - where-ever that came from makes no littlest sense to me.
Besides, the rye flour in the present COVID times is not even available (now go and throw it away! ........right).

Lately I even stared doing another trick - I toss some kefir grains into my sourdough batter.
I got so much kefir culture going anymore, mix in 2-3 tee spoons of it into the new baking batch as well (nothing but extra nutrition).
Hate throwing away excess kefir grains.

Overall, the sourdough starter is not much about saving money. It really is not (if what people are assuming).
It is about making more healthy bread - soaking and fermentation for several hours (8-12 hours) makes the bread more healthy by neutralizing phytic acid and pre-digesting the grain material. There is plenty of reading on the subject.

Commercial yeast is about convenience and speed, not your health.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
I find that sourdough in the breadmaker to have some limitations or perhaps the need for me to learn how to program special times and pauses. I find that I have to allow several additional hours for the second rise compared to bread yeast.

I made some biscuits a few days ago using the regular amount of baking soda but incorporating a cup of sourdough starter. I sure like the tangy taste of those biscuits compared to straight flour. It is best though not to dwell on the amount of calories in the butter I cut into the flour!;)
 

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I think Greg alluded to no-knead bread. Here is another recipe:

Recipe: No-Knead Bread

Time: 15 minutes of prep time plus 8+ hours rising

Ingredients
4 cups (20 oz. by weight) all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting
1/4 heaping teaspoon rapid-rise yeast (also called quick-rise, bread machine, or instant yeast)
2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon vinegar (optional)


Directions
1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Stir briefly. Add 2 1/8 cups water, 1 tablespoon of vinegar (optional), and stir until all flour is incorporated. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 8-10 hours at room temperature. (At least 72+ degrees) Dough is ready when the surface is covered with bubbles.

2. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with more flour and fold it over on itself three or four times, to make it easier to handle.

3. Gently form dough into a ball using enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers. Place dough onto a sheet of parchment paper lining a shallow container. (A 10 inch frying pan works well) Cover with plastic wrap and let rise for 1 - 2 hours at 72+ degrees. When the dough is ready, it will be more than double in volume.

4. About 20 minutes before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Grab edges of parchment paper, and transfer into pot. Cover with lid and bake 45 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 5 to 15 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.

Yield: One 2 pound loaf.


no-knead.jpg
No-knead slices.jpg
 

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That is amazing. Never thought I'd get a sourdough starter lesson here. LOL - My approach to beekeeping is like your approach to starter - set it and forget it. Bees know better than me what they need.

Funny I came across this because I had some extra proofed yeast and decided to try a starter with some rye flour a couple of weeks ago. The only thing I didn't do was refrigerate it so not sure it's any good at this point. I'm like you, I don't like the "throw 1/2 it out" part. So glad you shared your recipe and pic's.

From what it looks like, you have about 1 cup of starter you dump in your 5c of flour along with grains and let it do its thing. Meanwhile, without cleaning the starter jar, you just add 1/4c rye flour & 1/4 c water. Somewhere along the line you add more to it so it's about 1 c of sponginess and then refrigerate it?

I'll see if my starter is salvageable, if not I'll get a bigger jar with a tight fitting lid and give this a go. If this works at least I'll be able to get by w/o yeast (which has become impossible to get). At the rate we're going I need to order whole grains and mill it myself (not easy to find). Otherwise, I might try to grow my own wheat, oats and rye. Thank you for the lesson.
You mention a tight fitting lid on your jar. Keep it mind that you should only tighten it loosely. You need to let gases escape.
 

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I made the Amish Friendship bread in chocolate: 58ABBD47-9C6B-4BAD-8749-BB3A533BB42E.jpg
Added choc chips too; it’s very very good. No butter or anything needed except a cup of coffee, glass of milk, or tea.
 

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clover...
No butter or anything needed except a cup of coffee, glass of milk,
Me being picky, the tea seems a bit off but for the rest, Mmmmmm, licking my lips. Too bad I am not closer cause you are supposed to give some friendship bread away and I would hope to be a friend.
Cheers
gww

Ps good job grozzie :)
 
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