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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
[video=youtube;DNaQNma]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNaQNma_t0U&feature=player_embedded[/video]

If the video doesn't work: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNaQNma_t0U&feature=player_embedded
Maybe this is a stupid question, but would it be possible to use this method when installing bees from a package into a TBH?

I see obvious advantages to this method. What would be some disadvantages/things to consider?
 

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If your package fits into your TBH, I am sure you could, I do not know why you would want to though?
 

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If the package is wider than the hive body you could just set the package on top with the hole down as if it were a very wide top-bar.
 

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The disadvantage of this method are that if a cold snap occurs before the bees exit the cage they will not get a proper cluster formed on the queen and she could become chilled. It is better to dump/shake the package out completely on/around the queen where everybody is supposed to go.

I almost lost 30 packages once when I was a beginner using the method shown in the video.
 

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I would agree with JBJ that it is best to just dump them into the hive. It is possible to just set the box on top, but the number 1 concern should be for the queen and the faster the cluster forms around her the better. Management of a top bar is not for the timid beekeeper.
 

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Management of a top bar is not for the timid beekeeper.
Amen Brother!

I tried the method, but when I checked them later in the day it seemed like the vast majority of the bees was still in the package. The one plus I see with that is you don't shake the dead ones in, but they clean it quickly.
 

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Just make sure they cluster on the queen and you should be ok. A real cold night could chill the queen if there are not enough bees on her cage. The sooner you get them out of the package the quicker they will get to their bee duties of serving the queen, making comb, and general housekeeping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The disadvantage of this method are that if a cold snap occurs before the bees exit the cage they will not get a proper cluster formed on the queen and she could become chilled. It is better to dump/shake the package out completely on/around the queen where everybody is supposed to go.

I almost lost 30 packages once when I was a beginner using the method shown in the video.
Really good info! Thanks for responding. I hadn't thought of the bees not having a chance to cluster around the queen, or a cold snap. I don't get my packages until Early May and would *HOPE* that it would be warm enough. But this is Upstate NY, and it snowed today. I'm not sure we'll ever see "spring" here. :(

Management of a top bar is not for the timid beekeeper.[/QUOTE said:
Definitely not timid :) I just saw it and thought it would be easier on the bees. You all made very valid disadvantage statements, and I'm going to listen. Shake and dump is what I'm going to do. :D
 
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