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I need to make a couple of telescoping tops and wonder if I can use some corrugated metal roofing I have left over? It is actually 'R Channel' roofing, with a 1" corrugation about every 6". It is light colored and rather reflective of heat. My thought is it will last and help keep the hive cooler here in TX.

What concerns me is whether or not critters of one sort or another will set up housekeeping in the corrugations. Does anyone have any experience with this type of roofing on a top?
 

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I lack metalworking skills and a source for the sheet metal used in telescoping tops. I have been making mine of plywood and the scraps from box making and painting and caulking them really well. So what if they only last 10 years or so. I can make more.
 

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As Michael Bush often states, "Yes you can", but, My question is, "Do you really want to." It no doubt will work, and yes I have seen some tops with it on them. It will provide voids for ants, roaches, possibly even mice. It will work, but, I would prefer smooth metal, or better yet, just migratory tops.

cchoganjr
 

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I need to make a couple of telescoping tops and wonder if I can use some corrugated metal roofing I have left over? It is actually 'R Channel' roofing, with a 1" corrugation about every 6". It is light colored and rather reflective of heat. My thought is it will last and help keep the hive cooler here in TX.

What concerns me is whether or not critters of one sort or another will set up housekeeping in the corrugations. Does anyone have any experience with this type of roofing on a top?

Suggest you use 50mm or 75mm coolroom material. Very good insulation

Cheers

Geoff
 

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It could possibly help some with cooling. And yes, there could be sharp edges. But, try it and see how you like it. It is not going to hurt anything, and you already have it. It is not going to let anything inside the hive, so, all the downsides will be outside the hive.

I really like a heavy telescoping top when I use one. Helps to keep the top from blowing off in heavy winds when I don't put a concrete block on them in March and April.

cchoganjr
 

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I use corrugated tin on all my tops and lids for sun protection. I screw it on top of the wooden top. To date, I get an occasional spider, but no ill effects. It definitely helps drop the temp. If you can get the colonies in the shade around here, the temp drops about 40 degrees. If not they can get so hot you end up with a mess of melted comb due to radiant heat, which can quickly reach over 140 degrees. I have had bees abandon their hives because of heat - they could not not keep up with cooling it. The worst affected are the nucs, since they do not have the population to really get good airflow moving. I lost 4 this year before I could get corrugated tin sunshades on them. I use the tin as portable sunshades too. All of my hives have corrugated tin on them - except some of my smaller nucs.

For the desert, it is an excellent building material to avoid radiant heat. If you are someplace else - I cannot answer that.
 

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I use aluminum printing press sheets from our local newspaper facility. Very easy to work with, cut bend etc. They sell them to me for (2) for a buck. They are light and stay a lot cooler than steel tops.
 

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I got my tin tops from old roofs. all free. Can't beat it except that now I have them lying all over the place.
 
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