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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was later in the summer and I had a one-deep hive that was getting full. I didn't want it to swarm and I didn't want to put another deep on there and it be too much room for the bees to take care of since I was past the nectar flow. The majority of the hives I loose, I loose to wax moths (I know, you don't loose a hive to wax moths, the wax moths come and clean up after your hive is already weak or failing for some other reason). I didn't want to give this hive that is doing well now, too much room to defend, and have it get overcome with wax moths. So, I was in a situation where I didn't want to split and needed to give it more room but didn't want to give too much room and not be able to defend itself against the wax moths. So, I put a super on. They did great. It wintered that way with one deep and one super. I checked the hive last week and hive is looking great and brood is in both the deep and the super.

This was my idea:
1-put another deep on, on top of the current deep (put it between the deep and the super currently).
2-make sure the queen is not anywhere in the super with the brood.
3-put the super on top of the now (after step one) two deeps, with a queen excluder between the deeps and this super.

My thought was that the workers could still get through the queen excluder and care for the brood in the super. When the brood hatch in the super the workers would clean those cells. The queen couldn't get in there now to lay more eggs. So, after they clean the cells they would have drawn comb that they could now fill with honey. Seemed like a great way to have an entire super of drawn comb just sitting empty in a few weeks and ready for them to start putting honey in.

Is this a good idea or is there something I'm missing. One thing I was thinking was what the bees would do with the pollen and bee bread they have already in that super. Would they move it, or would it get all used up in the rearing of this last batch of brood growing in the super.

Interested in some insight from some more knowledgeable beekeepers. Thanks!!
 

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I think you have the right idea. I wonder, though, if the super being that far away from the main brod box if it would be warm enough. The alternative would be to put the queen excluder between the bottom box and the super now, wait for the brod to emerge, the add the new brood box, excluder, and super on top.

How full is the bottom box with brood? Would the bees start drawing comb in another deep box at this point for brood? In other words, there may be time to wait to add the second deep. If the bees are already making lots of brood, having the new deep might be fine, it would give the bees something to do, and tou be building up soon.
 

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I bet if you put the super on top with an empty deep between it and the rest of the brood they'll make queen cells in the top. I'd put the empty deep under the full one to avoid needing to shake out all frames in the medium to find every last one if they do
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Those are some good ideas.

I hadn't though about, with a new deep on there and that making a big distance between the super and the deep with brood, that they might not get too much pheromone up there and start making queen cells. I think that makes a lot of sense to put the queen excluder on now and let the brood emerge. Then put the new deep on and a queen excluder then the super on top of the queen excluder. At that point the workers are just cleaning cells out and it's the same configuration as two deeps and a super. And the super will have drawn comb freshly cleaned and ready to be filled with honey. Thanks for the input.

I can't wait to see if this works!
 

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I bet if you put the super on top with an empty deep between it and the rest of the brood they'll make queen cells in the top. I'd put the empty deep under the full one to avoid needing to shake out all frames in the medium to find every last one if they do
Muenster nailed it. If you did separate the brood nest you are starting down the Demaree method (look into it and you'll learn why). With the new box on the bottom, you are giving them space to potentially grow down, once they start you will also be giving yourself the option to reverse later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Awesome. Thanks for the info. It’s raining today but should be beautiful tomorrow so I’ll make the switch tomorrow and put the new/empty deep on bottom, the deep with brood above that, queen excluder on top of that , then the super with brood on top of the queen excluder.

Thanks!
 

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Just make sure you don't have any drone brood in the super since drones can't make it thru the QE. They get stuck in it and die. If there is drone brood, make sure they have a top exit somehow (hole in the super or crack the lid till they're gone).
 

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Putting a brood box of foundation on the bottom is pretty much a waste of time in my opinion. My bees almost never expand down, or only if forced and would almost rather swarm then. But my bees are contrary so who knows.
If they were my bees I would brush the bees down and put the excluder in place for three weeks. By then the brood will have hatched. Then put the second deep in place. But that’s just my opinion. Take it for what it’s worth. 🙂
 
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