Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,327 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking of designing a new feeder. I know open big buckets of feed cause a lot of drowning. What about a small container say an inch wide and an inch deep? if stacked what space would be good for them to access under the above one? 3/8?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,186 Posts
I can't see that it would hold enough to make much of a difference if it worked. A zip loc bag on the top bars drowns virtually no bees if you are competent enough to make sure the bag is sealed and you only place a hole in the top side of the bag. Sugar bricks work great for any time when it is too cold for the baggies. Both cost nothing or next to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,327 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can't see that it would hold enough to make much of a difference if it worked. A zip loc bag on the top bars drowns virtually no bees if you are competent enough to make sure the bag is sealed and you only place a hole in the top side of the bag. Sugar bricks work great for any time when it is too cold for the baggies. Both cost nothing or next to it.
goal is getting the feed into the brood area/cluster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,408 Posts
goal is getting the feed into the brood area/cluster.
I once had the wacky idea of fitting an inverted jar feeder lid with a long tube - say, 3 or 4 inches long - so that it would reach way down between the combs to where the centre of the cluster ought (?) to be. That experiment didn't work any too well - but I've since figured out how this could be done.

However, whether feeding syrup during winter ought to be done by a method such as this is a different matter: with hindsight, my main concern now would be that changes in air pressure during the winter period would undoubtedly cause dripping, not onto the cluster, but inside it. On balance, I think that risk outweighs any possible benefits.
LJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,026 Posts
Potential problems I see-
Each trough will only hold about a half pint (1X1X18 inches). If it isn't held level while being installed or if the hive isn't level, the syrup will run to the end of the trough and overflow. It will be a bother to refill.
Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,327 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Potential problems I see-
Each trough will only hold about a half pint (1X1X18 inches). If it isn't held level while being installed or if the hive isn't level, the syrup will run to the end of the trough and overflow. It will be a bother to refill.
Bill
Yes all issues i have also realized. Question here is on space. Is 3/8 inch beespace enough for them to work or should it be more like 1/2 or 5/8? wondering if 3/8 will cause pushing and drowning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,408 Posts
Yes all issues i have also realized. Question here is on space. Is 3/8 inch beespace enough for them to work or should it be more like 1/2 or 5/8? wondering if 3/8 will cause pushing and drowning.
Just want to say THAT is an important factor - not so much the height itself, but the whole access area issue.

A while back I made some mini Miller-style feeders for 3-frame nucs which had a ramp reaching down into an open bath of syrup. The ramp was made from expanded mesh with a height of around 1/2" and a width of around 4". The major problem I found was that once the bees discovered that some idiot was giving them something really tasty, and which avoided the effort of flying countless miles, a 'crowd-control' issue developed - in which the bees at the back were pushing the bees feeding at the front into - and under - the syrup. In short, it became a solid log-jam, with many bees being drowned as a result.

I'm sure such feeders DO work ok, but only if sufficient access space is provided.
LJ
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top