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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Update: this was answered in another post earlier today which I did not see until after posting. Moderator(s) you are welcome to delete as the other post (Finisher building comb on cells) contains answers. Thanks, js

So first off, I totally don't know what I'm doing.

So I have a queenless 6-frame Lyson poly-nuc stuffed with nurse bees as a starter. Plenty of pollen (along with a small amount of patty just in case, honey, nectar, some capped brood, and a foundation frame 2 positions from the cell frame in case they feel like building comb.

I have a 10-frame deep above 2 mediums where the queen resides below as a finisher. They are on the verge of swarming so the box is stuffed, even the top of inner cover has a layer of bees.

This round I left a bar in the starter to finish and some in the finisher as well. About day 10 they webbed up the cells with comb pretty good in both boxes.

I have cells mounted about 1.5" apart on wood, and I've done a JZBZ plastic bar that seemed less prone to this, although not completely. They are working some nectar source. Any tips appreciated. Thanks! :)
 

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Not sure that this will help---but I use an 8 frame deep (queenless) as a starter/finisher over another 8 frame deep (queen right) that is separated by a double screen board (helps with warmth this time of year in Richmond, VA). I move brood and bees up from the bottom to the top when needed to supply the starter. 5/6 days after grafting I remove the capped cells---either to a nuc, mating nuc, hive, or incubator. If I wait any longer webbing becomes an issue---one that I don't like messing with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not sure that this will help---but I use an 8 frame deep (queenless) as a starter/finisher over another 8 frame deep (queen right) that is separated by a double screen board (helps with warmth this time of year in Richmond, VA). I move brood and bees up from the bottom to the top when needed to supply the starter. 5/6 days after grafting I remove the capped cells---either to a nuc, mating nuc, hive, or incubator. If I wait any longer webbing becomes an issue---one that I don't like messing with.
That all great information. Thanks! 😃

You answered several questions. Yesterday I gently snipped around cells and putting them in mating nucs. They are not due to emerge for 5 days. Wasn’t sure it was safe to move them, and could have done an incubator as my son has several around here. But I had some styrofoam minis (first year with these) and plenty of nurses so I figured they could maintain the heat.

I can see myself using a double-screen, or at least using the same hive to start and finish. Thanks again
 

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I am not sure I understand your question. Are you asking if built up comb on cells means they are dead? That is what I interpret as webbing and the bees do indeed sometimes almost bury cells in comb. They tend to remove it and even thin out the wax on the cell end where the new queen is going to gnaw its way out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am not sure I understand your question. Are you asking if built up comb on cells means they are dead? That is what I interpret as webbing and the bees do indeed sometimes almost bury cells in comb. They tend to remove it and even thin out the wax on the cell end where the new queen is going to gnaw its way out.
Yes, they appeared to have healthy orange/brown cocoons where I would expect the cell to end. I was extremely careful snipping them out and have most in mating nucs, others to follow tomorrow.

Per good advice on another thread I made a thin queen bar and tried a few more. Thanks Vance. 😃
 
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