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Even thought I will not be able to do it this year, I would like to try to do some comb honey next year.

I read that the circular cassets are better drawn out and capped by the bees versus the square and rectanguler ones. Is this true?

What do you all use? Ross rounds? what is the easiest to use and are there kits for comb honey?
 

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I love my bee-o-packs. I have used the same ones over and over, will probably put them on again next year as the bees have totally ignored them.

What I did have good luck with is the Drapers comb honey system. It's a special box that takes 30 mini frames. You pull the frames and put them in a plastic container and sell them frame and all. I sold out in no time at $6.00 each. I am buying more for next year!
 

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I used a cut comb super (shallow super) with unwired foundation in the frames. Put on top a one-box hive with a queen excluder. This was my third year trying, first year to succeed. There has to be LOTS of bees in the hive. Four 4"X4" sections to a frame, each about 12 ounces.
 

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I didn't think they had a web site, so I did a google and found a site in PA. Not the same place I order from. I order from:

Draper's Super Bee
914 S Street
Auburn, NE 68305
402.274.3725

I don't understand the relationship. They have a strong resemblance to the equipment in PA., but have some stuff not listed on the PA. web site.

I like their DSB telescoping and inner covers a lot. Part numbers TB-46 and TB-66. Both covers (inner and outer) have notches on both ends for ventilation and entrance. Larry told me at one of the KHPA meetings that he has a local guy make them especially for them.

It could be that he also has the DSB Comb Honey Unit made for them locally too. It is listed on page 7 of their catalog, part number CH-16 @ $55.00

"A super with 30 mini frames. The bees build the comb honey directly in the frames. You simply remove the frames from the super and place the entrie frame into our DSB container. A very unique package!"

CH-26 - 30 refill frames - $29.50
CH-36 - 8 sheets of refill foundation - $4.00
CH-56 - 30 clear DSB comb honey containers - $9.75

So a complete refill will cost 43.50. I sold all 30 @ $6.00 like hot cakes. That's $180 minus the cost of the refill I netted $136.50

I don't have one handy to measure, but they are about 4 1/2" x 5".

I had about four that were not completely capped and thought that they would be the last to sell. Wrong!, they were the first to go. Parents wanted them to show their kids how a bee makes, fills, and caps the cells as a learning experiance.

I left a dead bee on the outside of the frame in the package. People loved it!

The funniest thing that they would ask is how I put the honey in the comb. :rolleyes: :D
 

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I love the idea of that. What would be neat is to build a tiny hive to fit the frames (like the japanese garden hives) and sell them from it. Around here with a full size hive body to display and a tiny hive to sell comb honey from I'd do well.
 

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>theres so much to learn about comb honey...

I definatly have a lot to learn. As often as not when I crowd the hive down and put on the comb super they swarm out. :( But it's like anything else, if you do it long enough you'll get better at it.
 

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I had to go in about once a week and cut out swarm cells. They did build them! Now, for someone wanting to raise just a few queens, that's probably the simplest method of doing it.
 

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How about when you crowd them down and put the comb supers on, you take their queen and let them raise a new one either from an egg or an introduced queen cell.

How much would that control swarming vs. hurting honey production?
 

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That won't do much for the crowding in the brood nest though and I think they'd be just as inclined to split company all over again as soon as a new queen begins laying.
 

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I like using the ross rounds. Easy to put together, easy to harvest/prepare for sale (snap on the covers apply the label). And the bees fill out most of the sections (sometimes the 4 corners don't get completely filled). The late Richard Taylor had a great book on comb honey production, it is worth reading. Yes there is a relatioship between the Draper's. I think it is nephew/uncle. With the nephew running the original operation in PA. When I was a teen I used to sell comb honey sections (both wooden squares, and Cobana/Ross rounds) to the Draper's.
 
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