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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my first year of beekeeping. On one hive I installed a package and had wedged the queen cage between two frames. When I came out to check it a four days later (it was pouring rain on day three so I pushed it another day) the queen had been released but the workers had drawn the comb very deep in the top corner of the foundation on one of the frames the queen cage was wedged between. I would say about a 3x3 section. Should I leave it as is or is there something I should do to correct it? There was enough space for me to replace the tenth frame by moving everything over to one side of the hive box but there is a larger gap between the center frames.
 

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Welcome!
You should include your area or region in your profile. It will help others answer questions.
I'm a relative newbee (3rd yr) as well. If there's no brood in those areas, I cut them down with a serated knife as if I were decapping the frame. If there's brood, especially a lot of it, I leave it until they emerge and then cut the cells down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the information, I will check today when I get home and thanks for the reminder on my profile. I had meant to do update it but had forgotten to go back and do it after I had registered.
 

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First off you need to put an internal feeder on that hive to help them draw out that comb. A package that gets caught in a week of rain could EASILY starve out. Do it IMMEDIATELY. As far the little bit that's been drawn from what I understand they drew the cells out deep because the frame was extra spaced from the queen cage? If that's the case just remove the empty cage and push the frames together. You want them as close as possible when they're drawing comb. Also a pollen patty would be a good idea. Good luck and get that feed on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
First off you need to put an internal feeder on that hive to help them draw out that comb. A package that gets caught in a week of rain could EASILY starve out. Do it IMMEDIATELY. As far the little bit that's been drawn from what I understand they drew the cells out deep because the frame was extra spaced from the queen cage? If that's the case just remove the empty cage and push the frames together. You want them as close as possible when they're drawing comb. Also a pollen patty would be a good idea. Good luck and get that feed on them.
I did put a feeder (both the can from the package and an additional container) on immediately though they have not taken much as we have a ton of available natural sources currently in bloom and I have seen them busily attending those. We have never had honeybees in our yard in the years I have lived here and so I am pretty certain they are mine. The lack of honeybees was my main drive for getting into beekeeping. My guess is the little that has been consumed happened on those rainy/ colder days. The deep comb is because of the extra space from the queen cage.
 
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