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Discussion Starter #1
After I lost my hive I cleaned it out and took the honey. I put the frames back in the hive figuring when I get my nuc the new bees will be able to feed off the remaining honey and not need to work so hard building comb. A couple of days ago with warmer weather I noticed a couple of honeybees at the hive; following two days there were a couple dozen.
My question is should I close up the entrance to keep them out or just let them eat.? My concern is when I get my bees next month will other bees will come back and rob them?
Is it possible they may move in and I will end up with two hives?
 

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it is six of one half a dozen of the other, scout bees looking for a new home for a swarm may communicate to the masses this is a potential new home. the nature of bees dictate that all the scouts visit potential home sites until they all agree on the best one. and you may catch a swarm! Robbers however will clean the hive out leaving empty comb for the new bees to dress up and use. As to weather or not they will return is anyone's guess, by the time your bees get to you there will be a lot in bloom, in fact you should be on the brink of a flow, It is unlikely the robber bees would choose to do battle over stores when there are easy pickings everywhere. by the time a dearth comes along your hive will be strong. you can close the hive up and preserve the bootie for your bees, which will diminish your chances of catching a swarm, or leave it open. if you choose the later I would however keep an eye out on the package for a while to be sure they do not have a robber problem.
 

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If you haven't checked on those boxes lately, I would think there is also wax moths in there already also. You will need to probably freeze the frames for that anyways, so go with Michael and setup a bait hive. I would actually put a frame up uncapped honey in there for the scouts/robbers to move to. Also, don't put it on top of the hive, that will get them to think this is a good place to go for food. I'd move it about 20-30' away if you can.
 

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Tjsegla:

Mr. Happy in San Diego doesn't know we had snow that stuck to the ground here in New Haven on Monday. I doubt you have to worry about wax moths yet, but the advice Michael Bush gave of setting up a bait hive (perhaps you'll get a swarm from me) with a few combs and taking the other supers and combs and keeping them where there's no chance of getting wax moth damage from any moths or larvae that might have survived the winter somehow. If you bring them inside, you can cycle combs through the freezer and protect them that way, or there's always paradichorobenzene crystals.

Where in New Haven are you? I'm at the base of East Rock. I consider myself lucky that all my colonies came through the winter ok. I've lost them over the winter in the past...truly sad. I hope I've finally gotten some winter-hardy, hygienic stock!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was not worried about wax moths because of the cold winter. I was concerned about bees thinking it was a food source but once the comb was cleaned out I figured they would stop because by the time my bees arrive there will be enough in bloom.
I am in Naugatuck not to far from East Rock. I only have one hive but thinking about getting another and figured if I inadvertently had new bees move in I would end up with two and not have to go back and forth on getting another hive
 
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