Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I thought there was a thread about this but, I searched and could not find it. My question is I am needing to clean some frames so I am going to scrape the comb off then pressure wash them. After doing this I think I will need to add some wax back to the frame. So how does one go about putting wax on plastic frames? Also do you have a different method on cleaning these frames? Thank you for any replies.
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,094 Posts
Some people have used a paint brush to brush melted beeswax on the plastic. I think you'll find after they've been used, it's not that necessary. They will accept them pretty well after the bees have polished and used the frames.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,105 Posts
You can spray sugar water on them after they
have been used with a drop or two of lemon
grass oil. But as MB said, once they are used
to the point of striping and cleaning they
probably don't need anything.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,105 Posts
I date my frames and will scrape the old
comb off every 4 to 5 years as part of an
IPM program. Lowers contaminants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
These are frames that I bought used with boxes that had not been used in a couple of years so some of them are dirty with moss or algae or something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
The best way to get plastic frames super clean is to build a "wax moth hive". Just put a bunch of old frames in a hive body, and stack them just like a hive, and have a bottom and lid, and then just wait a few months. After the wax moths have cleaned the frames, just shake off the webbing and then touch it up with a pressure washer if you want (but not necessary).

Doesn't work in the dead of winter, but it will other times.

Don't worry about waxing the frame- it will be readily accepted as is. I've used this method for years now, and it's the only way to go. Trying to pressure wash an old frame of comb is a pain... can't ever get all the old cocoons out and you end up a mess.

And don't believe the old wives tale that having wax moths around can hurt one of your hives... that's just not true. They only go after a hive that's ALREADY weak from something else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,053 Posts
I don't agree with that last statement...just this last summer I twice chased large wax moth larvae out of strong hives, no infestation, just a random larvae.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,139 Posts
Try using an uncapping knife to strip the comb, I use a double boiler to melt wax and I coat all new plastic foundation with wax it puts a heaver coat than the stuff you buy and cut down on the cost. As far as the stuff you clean you shouldn’t need to give them more wax.
As far as wax moths I wouldn’t do anything to encourage propagation of that evil Insect!

[ February 28, 2007, 03:46 AM: Message edited by: Brent Bean ]
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top