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I have a dozen med depth supers of uncapped honey which I probably should have fed back to my bees last fall but..................So now I still need to take care of these before I return them for the upcoming season. Rather than creating a feeding frenzy in the spring, I am considering placing these UNDERNEATH some colonies with an excluder over top to discourage queens from moving down into them. I have fed back supers like these in the fall just by putting them atop lighter colonies and within a few days the bees would carry the unripened nectar down. I am wondering if by placing the supers on the bottom it may act as more of a stimulus? Has anyone tried this approach despite the extra labor involved?
 

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Just to be sure I understand, you uncapped frames of honey but you didn't extract it? Or do you have extracted supers of comb?

If you have what I call wet supers, keep them where bees can't get to thgem until the first nectar flow starts and then put them on your hives so your bees can refill them. The bees will get right up there quick and clean them of old honey and then start storing new honey in them.

Yes, it will stimulate the colony.
 

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Put a medium empty(no frames) super above the inner cover. No screen on center hole so bees can get above inner cover.

Then place a super of honey above that. It helps to decap and mist with water so it is easier for bees to dissolve honey. Empty super will make bees think honey up top is not part of the hive and bees will move the honey down.

If brood area is full of brood/pollen/honey then add a medium honey super with empty comb, then inner cover, then empty medium and then decapped misted honey frames.
 
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