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Has anyone seen this article? Thanks.


Science 8 January 2010:
Vol. 327. no. 5962, pp. 152 - 153
DOI: 10.1126/science.1185563
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Perspectives
Ecology:
Clarity on Honey Bee Collapse?
Francis L. W. Ratnieks and Norman L. Carreck
Over the past few years, the media have frequently reported deaths of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Most reports express opinions but little hard science. A recent historical survey (1) pointed out that extensive colony losses are not unusual and have occurred repeatedly over many centuries and locations. Concern for honey bees in the United States has been magnified by their vital role in agriculture. The California almond industry alone is worth $2 billion annually and relies on over 1 million honey bee hives for cross-pollination. So what is killing honey bee colonies worldwide, and what are the implications for agriculture?
 

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I agree virus but now they appear to be coupled with mites and that exacerbates the problem. Lost one hive to this so far this year.
"Lost one to this so far this year." Lost one to what, mites and virus? What indicated so? So I know what to look for in my dead hives.
 

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Mark,

Don't know if you're serious or not. You certainly have more experience than I do.

I noted considerable dead mites on the bottom board and many dead bees with DWV. To me that adds up to mites and virus.
 

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I believe Mark (sqkcrk) was asking whether you lost a hive to mites a viruses, or lost a hive to colony collapse disorder (CCD). Most of us have lost hives to mites and/or viruses at some time or another. Many of us have no first-hand experience with CCD.
 

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Yes, I wasn't sure what the word "this" refered to, mites or a virus.

I know what a mite killed colony looks like, but what indicates that a colony died from a virus? I have never seen a dead colony that I thought died from a virus. I've inspected thousands of colonies for diseases and pest of honey bees, but never once saw one virus killed that I could field diagnose. So, I though you could tell me/us what to look for.
Thanks.
 

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Just reporting what I saw... there were many dead bees with deformed wings on the bottom of the hive. Figured it was caused by a virus. Was I wrong? Cluster dwindled throughout the winter until it froze.
 

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If you saw many bees with deformed wings, they likely did have DWV. And the virus likely did play a part in killing the hive.

The original post in this thread is about colony collapse disorder (CCD). The implications for ag at this point don't look so bad. The total number of colonies in the U. S. doesn't seem all that different now than pre-CCD. Beekeepers are pretty ingenious at making more hives out of existing hives.
 

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I get it now camero7. Thanks.

Unless I add a smily face, assume I am being serious.
 

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>>So I know what to look for in my dead hives.

>deformed wings on the bottom of the hive

>>I know what a mite killed colony looks like, but what indicates that a colony died from a virus? I have never seen a dead colony that I thought died from a virus

Isnt seeing DWV in your dead hive suggest that virus might of had a hand in killing the hive?
 

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Deformed wings are mostly caused by physical damage to developing bee pupae due to mite infestation although there are indications of a viral factor also.

Colony collapse is a jaw dropping what happened event where most or all colonies in an operation or region or location just vanish for lack of a better term. All the signs of a healthy bee population like fresh comb & wax, honey, clean brood comb, burred together, etc. is present. But no bees in all or nearly all of the colonies, occurring over a short period of time. Or at least that's how I read it.
 

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>>physical damage to developing bee pupae due to mite infestation although there are indications of a viral factor also

my thoughts are the damage is from the virus itself, that came from the mites within the infested cell.
if that virus can take down an entire colony? Probably not, but sure adds to the stress of the hive,
 

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You are correct, I just read a study on DWV and it is a virus that causes the wing deformities, not from the mite chewing on the immature wings of the pupae.
 
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