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Discussion Starter #1
everytime ive used frame feeders i get a lot of robbing...

so i've been putting 2 chickenwaterers of 1 gallon each in front of the hive using 1:1...

i have 4 hives, and yesterday i checked them... 90 % of the frames were really light... they dont have any stores of honey... not much anyways..

i gave them 6 gallons last week... they usually go through 2 gallons in a couple of hours..

i was going to get a 5 gallon chicken waterer, but someone told me on the chat forum last night that using waterers can spread nososma..

if i use frame feeders, they rob... so i dont know which to use... i plan on doing the antibiotics mixed with powdered sugar, but wanted to see what ya'll think..
 

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I too would like to know the downsides of open feeding. I currently use a 5 gal. waterer to keep them out of the pool and was planning on open feeding with it, if neccessary. You have to use rocks in the open rim to keep them from drowning and you will feed every bee within 3 miles, anything else?
 

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During these hot times I'll do the waterers for plain water. Have seen robbing tendencies if I do syrup in them. That is....unless I put them way off from the hives (which isn't a bad idea--the girls will find it). But with the plain water I find I do more for my wife's cats and the skeeters than I will ever do for the bees. If you can find a good place out of the yard it may work better than right in your apiary. Personally I don't have enough property to truly find an "away place" so I've been doing hive top feeders. Good luck.
 

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Well i myself like using top jar feeders and use an empty super then a top!

I build top hive feeders like the one in the photo, i make them for quart jars or 1/2 gallon jars! I also drill two 1" holes in the center for ventilation, works perfect!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
but i dont see any difference between frame feeding, top feeding, etc... they're all robbable... (i invented a new word) able to be robbed..

if i did the top thing, they would rob it too, wouldnt they?

i think a communal thing outside is do-able, i just wanted to know if it would spread a disease more..
 

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I don't see why robbing spreads nosema. Can you explain how that happens? And if you have robbing problems w/ plastic inside feeders, it seems to me like you would have even more w/ communal feeding.

Also, one of the advantages of using the innercover w/ holes is that you can surround the jars w/ a nice tight super to keep robbers out. But, usually I have seen these used when temps are down to where bees don't fly much anyway.

It sure seems to me like beekeepers are feeding alot more these days compared to years gone by, little guys and biggin's alike. What is going on?
 

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you might want to look at tighning up your hives if you want to stop robbing. feeding inside the hive should avoid robbing.also consider feeding in the early morning before the bees are flying much and be careful not to spill your syrup.
just my 2 cents
 

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we put our chicken waterer inside an extra deep on top of the hive and covered it with the outer and inner cover seemed to work fine
 

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I have used the CW to open feed. I use wine corks to keep the bees from drowning. They're easier to wash than rocks:D Last time I did it, I had some humming bird syrup to get rid of.(no dye) When it was all gone I ventured up the hill to the hives and there was some robbing. (I reduced the entrances and it quickly subsided) I have two hives that are splits that I wanted to get built up and ready for the fall and then winter. I read on this thread about bag feeders. Tried it, It works great!! Google bad feeders or do a search. you might find it usefull.;)

Rick SoMd
 

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i have used the cw to open feed. I use wine corks to keep the bees from drowning. They're easier to wash than rocks:d last time i did it, i had some humming bird syrup to get rid of.(no dye) when it was all gone i ventured up the hill to the hives and there was some robbing. (i reduced the entrances and it quickly subsided) i have two hives that are splits that i wanted to get built up and ready for the fall and then winter. I read on this thread about bag feeders. Tried it, it works great!! Google bad feeders or do a search. You might find it usefull.;)

rick somd
who would want a bad feeder on a hive of bee's ??????????? A spelling problem huh ?????
 

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BAD is a Trade Mark. It denotes a particular feeder. But I don't know if it is the unit or the person using the unit. Sorry Thread Author.
 

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I have used the CW to open feed. I use wine corks to keep the bees from drowning. They're easier to wash than rocks:D Last time I did it, I had some humming bird syrup to get rid of.(no dye) When it was all gone I ventured up the hill to the hives and there was some robbing. (I reduced the entrances and it quickly subsided) I have two hives that are splits that I wanted to get built up and ready for the fall and then winter. I read on this thread about bag feeders. Tried it, It works great!! Google bad feeders or do a search. you might find it usefull.;)

Rick SoMd
who would want to put a bad feeder in or on a beehive ???? a spelling problem here ???????
 

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sorry Sqkcrk i was replying to Rick1456 and click to you instead of his sorry , he nailed me one time on spelling so i was nailing him back now ! have a great day
 

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Here's well stated data on nosema:
http://www.scientificbeekeeping.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=56
Transmission of spores

Both nosemas require bees to ingest spores in order to become infected. The beekeeper should make efforts to minimize any routes of transmission. This was easier with apis, since its spores were only found in bee feces. Unfortunately, Higes, et al (2007) found that ceranae spores can be transmitted in pollen. Chen (2008 Conf) detailed how ceranae infection spreads to the bees' hypopharyngeal and salivary glands (specifically, nosema DNA was found there, Dr. Chen did not look for spores or the vegetative state (pers comm)). If indeed the vegetative state can make its way into the saliva or jelly, it could explain how foragers contaminate their pollen pellets with the spores, and would suggest that brood food, and perhaps any surface licked by bees may be contaminated (again, this is pure conjecture).

Overwinter bees with plenty of fully-cured quality honey or heavy sugar syrup. Honeys that promote dysentery increase the transmission of spores.
Minimize the crushing of bees during colony manipulations. Every bee that you crush is the equivalent of having a bee poop in the hive! Carelessly tossing in a pollen patty and crushing a hundred bees top and bottom smears any nosema spores that were in the crushed bees all over the patty that the colony will soon be eating. The resultant nosema infection may negate the benefit of feeding (Kleinschmidt 1988a).
Winter colonies in sunny locations to encourage cleansing flights.
Avoid allowing bees to drown or defecate in tanks of sugar syrup, insert feeders, or during barrel feeding, as this can spread spores.Avoid having stagnant water sources close to the beeyard. These can become contaminated by dead bees or cleansing flights.
Minimize the amount of time that bees are confined during hauling. Not only are they stressed, but they may be forced to defecate within the hive.
Nick Calderone (2008 Conf) found nosema in some package bees. Test packages and nucs before you spread them into your operation!
Extreme: move the colony during daylight and kill the returning “drift” of infected field force so they can't transmit spores to the emerging brood.
Finally, sterilize contaminated combs, or rotate them out.

Regards,
Ernie
 

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Thanks Ernie. That explains the contamination route.

Since thwe Field Test for Nosema is so simple and easy to learn, I wonder why it isn't done by NYS Apiary Inspectors. I know that Inspectors are taking samples for Lab testing and rates of infection, ie spores per bee, but isn't a quick diagnosis of whether they are present or not, a timely diagnosis of prescence, as important as knowing which kind is present?

Or, maybe, as is true w/ some of my friends, commercial operators are just going to treat for Nosema anyway, whether they test or not. We know that Nosema is present in just about every colony in NY, more or less.
 

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It sure seems to me like beekeepers are feeding alot more these days compared to years gone by, little guys and biggin's alike. What is going on?
I was wondering the same thing the other day...seems like many are feeding syrup and/or sugar almost year round. Is that normal? :s
 

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Or, maybe, as is true w/ some of my friends, commercial operators are just going to treat for Nosema anyway, whether they test or not. We know that Nosema is present in just about every colony in NY, more or less.
I know that a local elderly BK who I took some classes from told me that if I didn't routinely treat my bees twice a year with both FumagillinB and Terramycin that my bees would surely die. :cool: I told him thanks, but I was willing to take my chances. i thought it was funny that he didn't mention varroa treatment much- he basically said simply to split the hives every year to keep mites under control, which makes sense to me (as a concept at least, if not exactly practical).
Needless to say, I got my bees this Spring from someone who does not use those medications. They are doing great so far, time will tell.
 
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