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First, I totally accept that I'm a newbie here. And I defer to those with more knowledge.

So here's what I was thinking about, and wondered what some of the more experienced might say on it...

When I was in college, I really liked Chemistry. Its a fun subject. Unfortunately people teach people to hate it from the tests but its actually a cool subject...like how burning copper makes green flames and so on...and that's how you get fireworks. I liked wondering about stuff like that.

Anyway...I was reading the post about the guy wondering if he'd put too much sugar water in the hives, (I'm not saying he did or didn't). And I was thinking about anti-freeze and how it works.

I wonder if sugar water honey (I might be using the wrong terms...) meaning the low grade not real honey from sugar water could lead to overwintering deaths from the same principle of a car engine not having anti-freeze in winter? If real honey is thicker it would freeze less. And if a bee is eating real honey versus the sugar water honey then wouldn't it be more prone to chill also (even if it doesn't freeze) due to the same kind of idea as anti-freeze?

Curious what others think?

This could explain some studies on hive deaths maybe?
 

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I think the part you're not taking into account here is that the bees don't store sugar-syrup 'as supplied', but rather they dessicate it in the same way as they do with honey - so producing similar viscosities.

There are a few other interesting 'tid-bits' in a similar vein: bees will store fondant (a thick sugar paste) just as it's supplied - which often gives beekeepers a momentary concern, as it looks at first sight very similar to chalkbrood.
Also - bees will consume fully solidified Canola or Ivy honey (which are prone to such crystallisation) during winter, apparently without difficulty.
LJ
 

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Sugar water/honey is mostly for the carbs, both have simple sugars in various degrees. They may loose more from poor pollen quality or monoculture type areas. Seems to me it would be several forms of academics working in tandem
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Good question but I am pretty sure that even a 1:1 ratio syrup cannot freeze. Because winter in my climate has a lot of days in the 50s, I leave syrup on the hives all winter. Have not seen a frozen jar yet, although that was 2:1.
 
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