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I have a overwinter 5 frame nuc that I want to change over to a 10 frame lang---what is the best way to do this---HELP
 

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richhitch, I would just set the ten frame hive where the nuc is(with the nuc on the ground next to it) and take the frames out of the nuc and put them in the middle of the hive and put either foundation or drawn comb in the rest of the hive. I would do this in the evening hours myself, and feed 1 to 1 sugar syrup to build them up. Jack
 

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I would just put the nuc in the center of the 10 frame and put foundation frames of both sides of the brood area. I would put honey frames if they have them on the outsides. Depending on how strong the nuc is and when your nectar flow starts, I would probably feed them to help them get the foundation drawn. If you happen to have drawn foundation already, you would be way ahead. I would also put on a entrance reducer till they get built up strong. You may not get honey from this hive this year depending on your area nectar flow. It is early, so I may be wrong on this. I started mine in May two years ago and waited 1 year before I took any honey.

Mark
 

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As suggested, simply put your five frames in a 10-frame hive. When you do that, I assume the queen is already laying, so you ought to start feeding. Unless you have comb for those other five frames, the bees will need help in making wax to draw them out. When using foundation, I personally feed until all the brood comb is drawn out, 20 frames in 2 deeps...or 30 frames in 3 mediums.

My experience has been if I feed heavily until the bees have drawn out all their brood comb, and stop when they're ready for extracting supers, I get a honey crop the first season. I do not use queen excluders, and always leave the first super above the brood nest for their winter stores. The queen also usually makes it up there and lays a few eggs in that super also, but moves down as the honey flow develops. That helps prevent getting syrup in my extracted honey.
Regards,
Steven
 
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