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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Cut out from last summer. All cutout frames are still in high box along with some others. They have really fused all of the comb together from the cutout.

Had a large family of mice in the hive during the winter but I got rid of them. Luckily they didn't destroy any of the frames. They went up into the 2nd box (med) where I had newspaper between the boxes and dry sugar.

Colony has a small population. A very small amount of capped brood, no larva or eggs. No queen! But there is a supercedure cell at the top of that same frame. It could easily be ready for an emerging queen as I haven't been able to get back out to the farm in over 2 weeks.

  1. Have 4 other hives still living at the farm.
  2. Very little drone brood in those 4 hives.
  3. There are 2 colonies about 3/4 mile down the road from my location which probably have drones as they are both 4 boxes high. (Can't see the size of the boxes from the road.)
  4. Replaced 2nd medium box with a high box.
  5. High has 10 frames of brood comb and a lot of capped honey and hone. These came from deadouts over the winter.
  6. I have a huge amount of bees from a log cutout several days ago that is queenless.
  7. One hive at the farm has at least 4 or 5 frames of eggs. (She's a laying fool!!!)
Thinking about:
  1. adding 1 frame of brood and house bees.
  2. adding some bees using newspaper and SW with LGO.
These bees are fighters or they would have died out long ago. Especially with this bad winter. They made it through with a very small cluster which I find appealing.

Should I attempt to save them or let them struggle and probably die out? It's like they are on their last breath and made a new queen with 1 of the last eggs laid.
 

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Get the paddles out, this hive is not dead yet. I had a hive that I was given that the old owner thought was empty. When I picked up the hive, some bees marched out onto the front porch to see who was tossing their house around with such disrespect. It was too cold to open the hive to see what was really going on inside, so I waited til the next day. When I opened up the hive, there were 2 patches of bees on opposing frames facing each other. All total, there were maybe 200 bees. I gave them a frame of eggs/brood/bees to see what they would do. Just adding the 1 frame doubled if not tripled the amount of bees in this hive. Two weeks later, I added another frame of eggs/brood/bees again. The have raised a queen and the population is on the rise.

Craig
 

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You are on the wrong side of the 80/20, and you aren't willing to pay the costs of the 80. It is easy to spend 80% of your time on the 20% of your hives which will be non-productive, instead of putting your efforts into the hives which will be productive.

You could save the hive if you babied it. It might not be very productive this year, but you could probably save it. However, this will require that you baby the hive and give it plenty of time and TLC. As you have not made the time to baby the hive and give it TLC during the past two weeks, it seems you are not willing to pay the price required to save this hive.

If you really wanted to save the hive, why didn't you equalize your hives at the farm when you were out there? :scratch:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Because I really didn't have any strong hives at the apiary with lots of brood and the queen laying a lot of eggs.

I spent too much time last year babying some hives (swarms/rapouts) to the disregard of my other hives. Something I learned last year. Last year I would move brood from good hives to sorry hives or swarms when it would have been better to just consolidate the hives and strengthen the good hive. I thought it was my duty to save every hive. Naive, yes. It also wore on me mentally.

There is just something about this hive. It is a cutout from an apartment complex that is located close to 50 miles from me. I decided to wait till I go back in the next couple of days. I don't always have time due to other matters. But if they are still there or the queen has emerged and returned, I will dump a frame of bees and brood from 2 of my hives at the farm. If not, well I still have the comb plus the box of comb w/honey that I put on the hive before leaving last trip.

I am getting wiser every day. And most likely I will TLC a weak colony or 2. Just try to be a little more selective.

One that I nursed along late last year has busted loose. The queen is laying in every box. Several of the boxes have frames that are almost nothing but eggs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Weak hive still had a small amount of bees and they weren't leaving the hive. Probably because the queen cell has emerged yet. Added 2 frames of bees in the hive from hive6.

Hope that makes up for the dead out of hive1. Plenty of stores.
 
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