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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I got a NUC after taking 2 years off from beekeeping. I got all new deep frames and foundation, but I kept my old box and bottom board. I inspected the NUC frames prior to bringing them home and everything looked ok. Fast forward 2 weeks, the ladies drew out the rest of the brood box so I added another deep on top. I noticed the chalk brood on the landing board last week. I did an inspection today - 6 frames of the second story deep have been drawn, lots of brood, good laying pattern, no evidence of chalkbrood on the frames I inspected. So my questions are:

1. Should I go into the bottom deep to check at this point? And is it too soon to go back in or no?
2. How do you tread chalkbrood during the flow (when you can't use Apiguard)?
3. Is this hive doomed?

Thanks for any advice! IMG_7327.jpg IMG_7327.jpg
 

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Chalkbrood is a fungal disease that has no approved treatment, Apiguard has no effect on the fungus.

Chalkbrood usually does not kill a colony, but does weaken the adult population. Chalkbrood is usually associated with cold and moisture, the brood is chilled and the fungus infects the larvae. If the disease persists when the weather warms re-queening is often used as a treatment and is usually effective.

Do your inspection of the lower box on a warm day with little wind. If there are few adult bees in the box, and the comb has mummies in the cell, remove the comb. Tap the frames over a trash can to catch the mummies and remove what you can. Spray the comb with a water/bleach mixture and store it away for a week until the odor of the bleach leaves and they can be put back in service.

If the hive is not on a stand put it on one that is 6 to 8 inches off the ground, and in full sun if possible.
 

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I remember someone suggesting tossing a whole banana into the hive. Of course this raised controversy, but the theory was that it would encourage hygenic behavior and may cause them to clean it out. When you have more hygenic behaviors they will remove the infected larva/pupa before they actually become mummies. I don't know the efficacy of tossing other stuff in there to incite hygenic behavior, just know that certain genetics have more of it than others. I have not heard of any other treatments for it.
 
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