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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new nuc that had a caged queen in it that I brought home last week Saturday. I went over to check the feeder and peek at cage on day 4. The cage was empty but the bees just didn't seem that stoked, at least compared to the other hive. They where a bit loud and I had a couple bounce off me? Anyway I pissed off thinking that iam so new I must have been to noisy or that I stunk or whatever? So I had a beverage in the shade and waited a while just to watch. Anyway I wanted to watch the hives entrances for fun and I noticed what I thought were a bunch of dead pill bugs. Iam reading tonight and see they are chalkbrood mummies. I will Waite for x amount of days?- to confirm queen is accepted and that will change the chalkbrood outcome? I should go in there and inspect ASAP ? I should... Have another beverage or two and stop bugging bee source? Thanks sorry iam just a week new to beekeeping
 

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You just bought this nuc? I'd be calling the supplier and asking for replacement nuc, a healthy one this time. I'm just assuming you just bought this nuc from the wording of your post...
 

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Why are you so sure it's chalk-brood? If the nuc is only a week old in your possession, the problem, IMO, falls back on your supplier. You sure they didn't just get chilled in transit, or culling some drone brood? When you go in next, try to take and post some pics. Chalk-brood at this stage of the game seems like a rather extreme diagnosis...
 

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Depends on where it came from Miami. I have hives which I brought up from the south which have chalk brood in them. I would not be surprised to find that some of my nucs do too. The ones I just got home here a cpl days ago.

I agree w/ the two above. Talk to your supplier and see about getting a healthy nuc.
 

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If you do, in fact, have a case of chalkbrood it's not a death sentence. It's caused by a fungus that can be made worse if the hive is situated in a cool shady location with a limited lower entrance for bees to efficiently remove the mummies. It may also be made worse by too much disruption to the hive. It may clear up quite quickly in the right environment. I wouldn't be afraid to mention it to your supplier, though perhaps he knew of the problem, perhaps not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Why are you so sure it's chalk-brood? If the nuc is only a week old in your possession, the problem, IMO, falls back on your supplier. You sure they didn't just get chilled in transit, or culling some drone brood? When you go in next, try to take and post some pics. Chalk-brood at this stage of the game seems like a rather extreme diagnosis...
Not a scientist so you are right , iam not sure. The dead bugs on the bottom board on the front porch look like dead pill bugs but all white like they are dried up . I looked at many photos after and they do look the same as examples of chalkbrood but I will have to investigate it further. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Probably a correct diagnosis.
So what would the appropriate step be? Would new queen if viable help? If she is let it play out? If not re queen? Combine the young nuc's?try and get my money or new nuc? I ask more out of curiosity and industry standard than stress. Thanks charlie
 

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So what would the appropriate step be? Would new queen if viable help? If she is let it play out? If not re queen? Combine the young nuc's?try and get my money or new nuc? I ask more out of curiosity and industry standard than stress. Thanks charlie
Unless it is a serious case I would not requeen. I never have requeened due to chalkbrood, though that is the recommended reaction. I scrape the mummies off of the bottom board floor and hope for a nectar flow soon. A good nectar flow will cure lots of things.
 
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