Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looks like I got a case of chalkboard in one hive and ive seen it before in the spring with excessive moisture , I've reduced the size of the hive and will see if they can pull though . I'm wondering if there is any way to save the comb in the frames I took off some might only have a dozen or less cells of the white fungus , is there any way to clean it up .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Lol, I think you mean Chalkbrood, darn autocorrect amirite? It is generally good practice to remove infected stuff from the hive. They could clean it up, but why take the risk?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Agree requeen. I've heard all kinds of stories about cool damp springs etc etc. Funny thing is since I started focusing more on hygienic stock chalkbrood vanished no matter what the weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,543 Posts
Personally, I would first be more concerned of the why of excessive moisture/chalk brood. One hive that I had that was not positioned correctly, so water was collecting on/in the bottom board & lack of proper ventilation led to this issue. Worry about the frames later, correct the why of this issue, & the bees will take care of the frames?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
As far as the why I wonder some times if a queen stops laying for some reason and the number of bee's go down and the space there in is to big then moisture becomes a problem . I have seen this before in my beeyard never really bad though normally not a complete lost and only one hive affected and in the spring . If numbers are good going into winter i usually consolidate down to 5 mediums . I have the affected hive in three box's now with a nice clean super of drawn comb right on top of the queen . I checked the hive today and it seems good and active .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,409 Posts
Last year the spring was cold, wet and miserable - most of my hives located on grass had chalkbrood. I decided to take no action. So far this year spring has been warm and dry - with not a single case of chalkbrood.

So - my plan now is to move hives off the grass wherever possible, or at least to raise them higher off the ground.
LJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,692 Posts
I have to agree with the other's here who've recommended to re-queen with different genetics. I've had chalk in the past, but no more once I got better genetics throughout the yard. Damp conditions won't set it off in a hive with genetics that are resistant to chalk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
956 Posts
Years ago a purchased nuc gave me a case of chalk that wouldn't quit.Requeened twice with hygenic stock to no avail.Finally cured with shaking on to foundation ,destroying comb and what little honey they had and feeding syrup.

Quote: Spores
"The mummified larva will transition from a white to grey-black colour, which shows the completion of the fungal life cycle and the creation of new spores capable of infecting a new larval host. These spores will remain capable of infecting other bee larvae for up to 15 years. Each Chalkbrood mummy will produce millions of spores which stick to hive components, pollen and adult bees. Spread typically occurs when there is an accumulation of mummies beyond the worker bees’ capacity to manage. If worker bees remove mummified larvae from the hive before the spores are produced (before the mummified larvae transitioning to the grey-black colour), the spread of the fungus within the hive will be limited."

From here:
https://beeaware.org.au/archive-pest/chalkbrood/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,487 Posts
I agree with Jack, new comb. There is a possibliity some of the herbicides agrevate chaulkbrood. Spring around here sees alot of Roundup.


Crazy Roland
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I am sorry , but truly hygienic stock does not get chalkbrood. I have seen many times unhygienic stock with chalkbrood and in the same yard truly hygienic stock will not show any signs at all of it. you can put a comb full of chalkbrood into a hygienic hive and they will clean it up and relay the frame and never show chalkbrood on the frame again. If you requeened and still had it I'm sorry to say the queens you bought were not hygienic stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was able to get a few hygienic queens from are bee club a few years ago when I needed them for splits but all of sudden they seemed to have problems with there queen rearing program and not getting much success and so far they havent had queens available for the last few years and I have just let hives requeen themselves which might be whats going on . I have to admit I was giving up on the idea of special hygienic queens being able to do much good in a small beeyard as the mutt drones pretty much dilute any good traits you get in a few years .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
they need to be tested every year 2 times a year to be sure the genes are being controlled in order to maintain an actual breeding program. We will start testing next week and then again end of May and probably again in July/August. then when you add the time for VSH testing in too you do need to be dedicated in order for good results. For just open mated production queens the Olivarez Italians and Saskatraz all have very good results for hygiene.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,409 Posts
There's a world of difference between queens which produce brood which are resistant to chalkbrood, and queens which are hygienic. Hygienic queens are not a cure for the problem - all their colonies will do is remove the evidence so that you no longer consider that you have a problem - but the chalkbrood persists, only now out of sight.

As for re-queening - re-queen with what ? How anyone can distinguish between a chalkbrood resistant strain and one which is hygienic is beyond me - which is why I don't bother re-queening.

Sterilising the hive and frames, and supplying new wax will also probably not solve the problem long-term, as any bees visiting neighbouring hives will undoubtedly bring chalkbrood spores back with them.
LJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
That's where you're wrong it is not that they are resistant but instead able to detect an issue and remove brood before it reaches the point of becoming contagious. This is the same with AFB they are able to clean up and eliminate the issue by not allowing it to spread though the brood by dealing with it before it becomes spore forming. You can read many of the studies from people like Marla Spivak if you'd like more info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
AJ Are you freezing brood and counting the brood that has been removed to test for hygienic traits or are there other ways
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Is there anything I could spray the comb with that would kill the spores to some degree before placing them back on the hive
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top