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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see that stainless steel, plastic and glass are used to store honey depending on the quantity.

In the distant past I would imagine that some form of ceramic container was used.

Has anyone seen Stoneware being used or know of any reason why it should not be used? I can get some stoneware containers at reasonable cost and I am just thinking whether or not to use them.....
 

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I don't see why it wouldn't work. Stoneware here is cost prohibitive, but would be a novelty way to store or sell your honey.
 

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At one time, in the not too distant past, honey was sold in cans. Like the large tomato cans. And before that, in wooden barrels.
 

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Two potential problems: cost and most ceramic containers don't seal well. Moisture could possibly migrate into the container. Since honey is hygroscopic, it is possible to increase the chances of fermentation. My wife goes to tons of garage sales and auctions. We have a small collection of ceramic honey containers on a shelf in the kitchen that displays other honey-related items.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Honey in cans ..... hmmm ... never seen that or even heard of the concept. Must be difficult to manage an opened can.

Wooden barrels set my imagination alive. A barrel can be any sort of size I guess but in any event the quantity is going to be quite large. I guess this must be back in the days of say C C Miller.

Swobee - interesting observations. Please tell me ... how do people normally seal a ceramic container? I think this has to be the key since keeping the environment out and the product in is a fundamental.
 

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to seal a ceramic container, put the ceramic lid on it and seal with bees wax, just a thought since there were not rubber seals say 100 or so years ago. Think of how canned goods were sealed by pouring melted parafin on top of them.

G3
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had thought about sealing with beeswax but sort of dismissed it in my mind on the basis of cost. But really it is a good idea ...

I had no idea that melted paraffin was used to seal cans as well. Whilst I know computer technology well, I think my education must be rather lacking ....
 

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The melted parafin was used to seal canning jars, not metal cans. This was used before pressure canning (with glass jars) came into use. It is not used much any more since it will not make a very good seal to keep out botulism.

I would think honey only needed to be sealed enough to keep it from drawing moisture to it.

G3
 

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We have a couple of cans, advertising honey in addition to the ceramic. One of her ceramic containers is a Hull? or other brand popular with ceramic collectors these days. The metal ones look like the same cans that peanuts used to come in- remember the old keys on the bottom of peanut cans? I believe the ones my wife has are all advertising honey from ohio. The ceramic containers she found at auctions are mostly what I'd call table-use honey containers. Most have a groove or notch for the wooden dipper to rest against. If I don't forget, I can take a couple of photos and post them.
 

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I would think the ceramic should be glazed to reduce the ability of moisture to move through it. For instance, unglazed pottery keeps water cool by slowly oozing and evaporating the water.

It would not be good for selling honey as the attraction of the beauty and color of the honey would be lost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is very interesting. I see that the markings on one of the cans is for 5LB. That of itself is a lot of honey. The "standard" measure here is probably 1KG which is just over 2LB.

One of my concerns had been ants. In this part of the world they get everywhere there is any hint of food. Standing a pot on a saucer full of water solves this but it is really not a very practical approach.

So .. an airtight seal is clearly the best approach but making that happen on a ceramic container will take a bit of thinking ... (apart from of course the consideration of preventing water absorption from the atmosphere).
 
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