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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings from Central Idaho. My 3 lb Saskatraz queen package ships next week so I'm trying to get things together for my 1st foray into be keeping. Still have many questions and a bit concerned when I started to read about the advantages/disadvantages of SBBs. My current setup includes a SBB, 4 deep 10 frames, and 1 medium. Thought I had a solid bottom, but now that I pull the box, it's for a Langstroth hive. Doesn't fit as well at the SBB. Got Global patties, liquid feeders with feed and doing a bunch of reading. Right now, my plan is to use the SBB and block off the opening and use one 10 deep frame for brood. Looks like I should add two deep frames to start? Open for any advice, and again just a newbie...
thx
Kevin
 

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Welcome to Beesource!

Looks like I should add two deep frames to start?
Are you saying that you only put two deep frames in the ten frame deep box? If so, then No, don't do that. The box should always be full of frames. Ten frame brood box should always have ten frames in it unless you are using one frame slot for a frame feeder. When you get to the honey supers you can get away with using one less frame, as long as you evenly space the remaining frames in the box. This allows the bees to make fatter honeycombs that are easier to uncap and extract.

Good luck with your bees, be sure to seek out a local bee club, it's good to have a close by resource for help if you need it. Especially if you need to replace a queen on short notice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome to Beesource!



Are you saying that you only put two deep frames in the ten frame deep box? If so, then No, don't do that. The box should always be full of frames. Ten frame brood box should always have ten frames in it unless you are using one frame slot for a frame feeder. When you get to the honey supers you can get away with using one less frame, as long as you evenly space the remaining frames in the box. This allows the bees to make fatter honeycombs that are easier to uncap and extract.

Good luck with your bees, be sure to seek out a local bee club, it's good to have a close by resource for help if you need it. Especially if you need to replace a queen on short notice.
thanks for the response, didn't mean to say I was limiting the number of frames, my question is how many super boxes should I start out with. My original thought was to start out with one 10 frame brood box, but after reading some of the forums feeds, now I'm thinking I should start out with two deep 10 frame brood boxes. I am seeking out locals for guidance. I do have 9 frame spacers for the honey supers and plan to go that route
 

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I should start out with two deep 10 frame brood boxes.
Not "start out with" but maybe "build up to." You don't want to give the bees more space then they can defend. I don't know if small hive beetles are a problem in central Idaho, but here in Mississippi, if you give the bees too much empty room the SHBs will run them off before they can get strong enough to defend the hive. Put them in one deep box, then when they have 8 of the ten frames drawn out and covered with bees and several frames of capped/emerging brood add the second deep box by bringing up two frames of emerging brood from the brood nest into the second box and then close up the space in the bottom box and add two more empty frames to the sides of the box. Again, that's what I would do down south. Perhaps someone will have better advice for your area. By the way, it's a good idea to add your location to your profile so it will show up in your info pane when people read your posts. Most beekeeping advice is very dependent on your local climate.
 

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Correct. Start with one box and build up to two. When that is nearly full then add your supers. As you get better at reading the bees, and learning what they want, you may be able to go to single 10 frame deeps. I run single deeps but also don't get winter like you. You may want to stick with double deeps after you pull your honey supers so they have enough food for winter.

I'm from Northern Utah and always ran doubles, but many Canadian keepers run singles. Play it safe for now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Feel good. Saskatraz queen arrived today healthy & active with a full box of workers. Got her in the box & last check all seems well. Marshmallow pretty sticky on my gloves but got it in the cage. Excited to see if she's laying in a week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Feel good. Saskatraz queen arrived today healthy & active with a full box of workers. Got her in the box & last check all seems well. Marshmallow pretty sticky on my gloves but got it in the cage. Excited to see if she's laying in a week.
Disaster! Went on vacation to TX last week & got a text from the house sitter that a bear had knocked over the hive! The super boxes were destroyed! Looks like I'll try it again next year.
 
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