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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my hives had become queenless; I put in a frame of young larvae and eggs and they raised their own queen from that frame. Unfortunately, they became much more defensive - a real change in behavior. I figure the virgin queen mated with drones with Africanized genes. I ordered a mated Italian queen from R Weaver in Navasota TX, found the queen mother of the devil spawn, and installed the new queen in her little cage with the sugar plug.

That was 11 days ago. I had been in a panic about requeening, and I realized after reading some more that I had done it under less than ideal conditions - not letting them be queenless overnight, not in the middle of a honey flow (or fed artificially) I did an inspection today (they are still mean as burned rubber) and I saw a patch of cells that had "snot" and what might be larvae. I have never been good at spotting eggs - do the worker bees put in the jelly after the egg has been laid?
 

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Is the snot white and does it smell bad?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No bad smell. Lots of covered brood, lots of dry cells, and a patch of "snot" cells in the middle of a frame.

The egg goes in first, right? and then the jelly?
 

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We generally refer to it as milk brood, and yes it is brood food. As soon as the egg hatches the nurse bees start feeding. This produces a small lake of milky fluid that the larvae float on. It will take six weeks for the new queens behavior to totally replace the nasty behavior of the old queen. In a couple of weeks you will start to see a change in behavior if the new queen is milder tempered than the previous queen.
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good, that is reassuring. "Milk Brood" is a more accurate term than "snot".
 

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the average life expectancy of a worker is 4 to 6 weeks this time of year, average is 1/2 of them not all of them. . it takes roughly a month for a new queen to start laying and have her daughters emerge, in a month and a half things may well be better, but it will take at least 8 or 10 weeks to get rid of those real nasty genetics. if you see a big improvement in a few weeks it was not just genes making them nasty... I am wondering, if you thought your problem was Africanized drones mated to your queen, why in the world did you get another texas queen?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, I live in stupid Texas now.

I have been happy with the productivity and gentleness of the mated queen and her offspring that I got from R Weaver in Navasota TX spring a year ago. The swarm/cutout hives that I have are also fine - I think they were escapees from a beekeeper that used a similar breed. I had some "mutt bees" that I got from the Brazoria beekeeping club that were gentle. The story around the club was that the old man who worked these bees would bang on the hive to test the colony behavior, and if they were mean they were eliminated. (This colony did not thrive for me, I think because of old comb and a late start).

So I think the Africanized bees are out there, but attentive queen breeders can affect the genetics enough so African behavior is not inevitable here. Sort of like "herd immunity" with measles vaccination. If there are enough drones around with gentle genetics, the situation is not so bad.
 

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Takes about 3 generations for my gentle queen's daughters to get hot around here, so I know there are some africans somewhere, but generally a good queen, and her offspring, are good for 1.5 to 2 years, if I don't let a swarm take off can be longer. I'm in fort Worth, And I bought from BeeWeaver I think. Could have been R Weaver. Will have to look it up.
 

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In beekeeping "snot" usuall refers to it being stringy or ropy... in other words you dip something in it and pull and there are strings of "snot". This is often a symptom of AFB which is one of the scarier diseases as it makes spores that last, as far as we know, forever.
 
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