Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Caught this small swarm.....maybe 100 bees and the queen. This is very late for south central Texas, and the colony is super small. I'm doing the 1:1 sugar water and pollen substitute. I'm also getting some in and out traffic. This is day 2 and so far so good.

64770
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,101 Posts
Caught this small swarm.....maybe 100 bees and the queen. This is very late for south central Texas, and the colony is super small. I'm doing the 1:1 sugar water and pollen substitute. I'm also getting some in and out traffic. This is day 2 and so far so good.

Give them a frame of capped brood and bees.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cobbler and Murdock

·
Registered
Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
Joined
·
555 Posts
Shouldn’t really be issue in your area, you have until November ( Average date of first freeze 22nd Nov. ) and I would think you can have them ready by then. Agree with above though a few extra bees should get them moving along.
 

·
Registered
Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
Joined
·
555 Posts
Just incase, wouldn’t start them off in anything larger than a five frame Nuc, as it will slow their brood rearing capabilities.😀 All the best!
Cody
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just incase, wouldn’t start them off in anything larger than a five frame Nuc, as it will slow their brood rearing capabilities.😀 All the best!
Cody
I have them in a 8 frame brood box right now. I'm going to wait a few days and order a 5 frame nuc box.
 

·
Registered
Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
Joined
·
555 Posts
I have them in a 8 frame brood box right now. I'm going to wait a few days and order a 5 frame nuc box.
You could always just use a divider (follower board) and move it as they grow. Easily made, save your self some money. Of course once you have a five frame you will be set to do a split next season.👍🏻
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,229 Posts
I have them in a 8 frame brood box right now. I'm going to wait a few days and order a 5 frame nuc box.
You don't need to waste time and money on 5-frame boxes.
The 8-frame boxes are much better - there are more versatile and multi-use and all you really need.
Just reduce your toy-swarm to two frames and insulate them - they should be on two frames and no more (until/unless you add more bees to them).

An insulated follower board can be as simple as this (pictured).
 

Attachments

·
Registered
About 40 Colonies
Joined
·
6,460 Posts
You basically caught a queen with a few more attendants they they normally ship with. I'd cage her and make a split with her once I knew she was laying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,229 Posts
You basically caught a queen with a few more attendants they they normally ship with. I'd cage her and make a split with her once I knew she was laying.
+1
In fact, with me, she'd go directly into one of my Styrofoam coolers (the smaller ones).
Unless bees are added urgently, this little cluster can not maintain much of any brood even.
An insulated micro-nuc with feeding would be ideal - IF no additional bees are available.

Personally, I'd grab such a micro-swarm just fine for queen mating/proofing (because I have equipment for such swarms).
She could be a great queen, never know.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You could always just use a divider (follower board) and move it as they grow. Easily made, save your self some money. Of course once you have a five frame you will be set to do a split next season.👍🏻
Yes, I should have one available for situations like this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You don't need to waste time and money on 5-frame boxes.
The 8-frame boxes are much better - there are more versatile and multi-use and all you really need.
Just reduce your toy-swarm to two frames and insulate them - they should be on two frames and no more (until/unless you add more bees to them).

An insulated follower board can be as simple as this (pictured).
How is the follower board installed in the box? I take it that the entrance is reduced to how ever many frames you have partitioned off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,229 Posts
The follower board == dummy frame.
It hands just like a frame (in fact, the picture I posted above IS a frame - just with taped to it cardboard).

Reduce == reducing the living volume so that the small amount of bees is able to condition it.
You reduce the space by the outer-most dummy frame (or two dummy frames from both sides).

Your entrance should be virtually for 1-2 bees to pass and no more - for your situation this is given and goes without saying.
NOT "reduced to how ever many frames you have partitioned off" - this is a giant gap - you are asking for your bees to be robbed out with such entrance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The follower board == dummy frame.
It hands just like a frame (in fact, the picture I posted above IS a frame - just with taped to it cardboard).

Reduce == reducing the living volume so that the small amount of bees is able to condition it.
You reduce the space by the outer-most dummy frame (or two dummy frames from both sides).

Your entrance should be virtually for 1-2 bees to pass and no more - for your situation this is given and goes without saying.
NOT "reduced to how ever many frames you have partitioned off" - this is a giant gap - you are asking for your bees to be robbed out with such entrance.
Got it👍
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
Maybe tiny swarms are common in Texas but in the Northeast its a sign of a stressed hive with a high viral load. Personally I would keep them away from other hives for awhile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Maybe tiny swarms are common in Texas but in the Northeast its a sign of a stressed hive with a high viral load. Personally I would keep them away from other hives for awhile.
Not common, but it does happen. Since it's so late in the year I'm thinking something must have happened to the main hive causing them to swarm. I snatched them from a bank parking lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,229 Posts
Maybe tiny swarms are common in Texas but in the Northeast its a sign of a stressed hive with a high viral load. Personally I would keep them away from other hives for awhile.
Not necessarily a trouble.
Rather N'th after-swarm with a virgin - nothing new.
Also in TX there is often presence of AHB influence - another factor driving tiny swarms (not necessarily bad, until tested as bad).
I'd grab it and test it out and don't worry too much until then.
 

·
Registered
Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
Joined
·
555 Posts
Not necessarily a trouble.
Rather N'th after-swarm with a virgin - nothing new.
Also in TX there is often presence of AHB influence - another factor driving tiny swarms (not necessarily bad, until tested as bad).
I'd grab it and test it out and don't worry too much until then.
Really wouldn’t worry period, AHB genetics are fairly well dumbed down for the most part. Temperament will show as they grow, and if it turns overly defensive re-queen immediately. Make sure you use a press in cage when dealing with defensive colonies, suspecting AHB if you want a successful introduction. However at their current colony size, I suspect You won’t see it for some time. That said as they grow make sure you suit up, I have had to re-queen quite a few of AHB colonies, so just pay special attention to defensive behavior out side the norm. If it continues longer than two inspections re-queen. There are very few colonies if any in TX that will not test positive for some AHB genetics aside from instrumental insemenation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Really wouldn’t worry period, AHB genetics are fairly well dumbed down for the most part. Temperament will show as they grow, and if it turns overly defensive re-queen immediately. Make sure you use a press in cage when dealing with defensive colonies, suspecting AHB if you want a successful introduction. However at their current colony size, I suspect You won’t see it for some time. That said as they grow make sure you suit up, I have had to re-queen quite a few of AHB colonies, so just pay special attention to defensive behavior out side the norm. If it continues longer than two inspections re-queen. There are very few colonies if any in TX that will not test positive for some AHB genetics aside from instrumental insemenation.
These will be backyard bees. If they start acting stupid, down the road they go to my friends ranch. That's a major concern with catching swarms, you don't know what you'll end up wjth.
 

·
Registered
Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
Joined
·
555 Posts
These will be backyard bees. If they start acting stupid, down the road they go to my friends ranch. That's a major concern with catching swarms, you don't know what you'll end up wjth.
Sounds like good place to re-queen if you need to, it’s always nice to have options.😉 I have had some excellent survivor queens from swarms. That said, I would say I have to re-queen about 1 in 3 colonies from swarm traps, cut outs etc.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top