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I am probably going to get flamed for this but....I don't understand why people go out and catch swarms to sell(yeah I know its for $ ) I think its wrong! I can see if its is a problem to a homeowner and such or if you are doing it to increase your own bee hives or if its your bees to start with but otherwise should nature be left untouched?
 

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Well on one hand they take the time to catch the swarm, build or buy a nuc or package box, if they do not need the bees then sell them. Its probably better for the swarm to be in some keeprs hive then to be seen as a nuisance by the uneducated and destroyed.
 

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A persons time is worth $$ and by selling it helps recoup expences. Many people wont pay for someone to remove a swarm in their yard. You and the home owner both work out by selling the swarm.
 

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If we left creation alone there's not much of a way we could survive. We couldn't go out in the spring and pick morels, we couldn't shoot a turkey, we couldn't catch a fish..... Sure we can cultivate etc. but it's still creation. What is on this earth is ours to enjoy and utilize for life. Ok, before I get in trouble, all in good stewardship with others in mind coming after you.
 

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provided they go to a good bee keeper (and I don't mean to be offensive by that, I just mean one that's not neglectful, or just hasn't done any homework). they have a better chance of surviving, I cannot remember the exact statistic so please correct me, but in the book Honey Bee Democracy, I believe something like 80 percent of the swarms in the wild do not survive the winter.

This morning I purchased a swarm from a couple that has 2 or 3 swarms come to their house every year or so, I was estatic I got quite a good bundle of bees for $50 with genetics that should be able to survive the winter. They got some money for their time, and aren't quite ready to get into BeeKing. I'm not sure how close that swarm was to choosing a nesting site, but the rain and snow that came in over the night would have surely made it a bit tougher at it, especially if the decided an overturned wheel barrow or the like was the perfect site, I'm sure the "landlord" would have kicked them out in a hurry.

Selling swarms I feel is beneficial for both bees and people as we like to let nature run its course, but often times it can lead to an unworkable situation (like a bear in a garbage can) Just my two cents, i'm open to correction and other view points, I know I'm not expert and do not want to represent myself as such.
 

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>I don't understand why people go out and catch swarms to sell

People need bees. This meets that need and fills the need with bees that may have some good genetics (they were thriving enough to swarm). What we need is for all the beekeepers to be keeping bees that can survive and thrive and this seems like a good supply for that.
 

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I don't sell primary swarms because they are worth 60+ pounds of honey to me just their first season, but I do sell secondary swarms.

I have no problem with it as I think 90% of swarms are never seen or reported.


Don
 
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