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Discussion Starter #21
Reading through all the comments, I'm surprised that no one has mentioned that CI can be used on induction stoves.
Heat is applied faster than gas, it is as adjustable as gas and it is more energy efficient than electric burners.
Nothing but the pot gets hot so it is much safer, especially around children.
I bought an induction "hot plate" and it has become my go-to cook surface, sitting right next to my electric range.
Hmm.
I need to google about the "induction hot plate".
Just being behind on kitchen tech, I guess.
 

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Cast iron is the best for making a pizza, the crust comes out crisp and perfect. I do have a problem getting the first seasoning right, somehow I cannot make it so eggs do not stick to my cast iron frying pans.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Hmm.
I need to google about the "induction hot plate".
Just being behind on kitchen tech, I guess.
Interesting - this induction hot plate gizmo.
I did not know.
Works with magnetic cookware only (which includes CI).
Maybe we need one.
 

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Interesting - this induction hot plate gizmo.
I did not know.
Works with magnetic cookware only (which includes CI).
Maybe we need one.
As long as "magnetic Induction does not alter food or oil in a negative way then it should be fine.
It does cook, I am not sold on the induction for food safety.

IMO fire has the best taste for cooking, "radiated" heat.
The smoke can also add in some flavor.

My Cast is used a lot on the cook stove (wood fired)

for that use it is very good.

GG
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
As long as "magnetic Induction does not alter food or oil in a negative way then it should be fine.
It does cook, I am not sold on the induction for food safety.

IMO fire has the best taste for cooking, "radiated" heat.
The smoke can also add in some flavor.

My Cast is used a lot on the cook stove (wood fired)

for that use it is very good.

GG
According to https://www.amazon.com/ospublishing...atkamznsearch-20&cv_ct_cx=induction+hot+plate

the energy from the magnetic field causes the material of the pan to produce heat.
So basically no difference, in theory.
The food prepared is directly impacted when contacting by the heated cookware surfaces.
The induction does not impact the non-magnetic food itself.

HOW the cookware itself is heated is less significant - either by contacting other hot surface, by contacting hot gases, or by solar radiation, or by internally heating due to magnetic field interaction.

I do hope that the induction will heat a CI skillet uniformly (compared to my crappy electric burners).

But fair enough, not jumping to grab the induction gizmo just yet - enough junk around here as is.
Also - wife would be unhappy with aluminum non-stick cookware not usable - just another complication.
 

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Sorry, I did some power transmission Studies (Transmission Line theory, Micro wave guide , Induced power transformers) for a 4 year degree, and the Induction if "focused out" to induce "heat" in this instance, into the Pan, the presumption that Zero Induction comes past the surface of the pan and that Aforementioned Induction is "Harm less And not removing food value" from what we are cooking, has not been clearly communicated. It may be fine with some oils and some foods, but deep in my gray matter "Magnetizing, inducing to the point of high heat, is not harmless.

I'll stick with radiated.

Better jump if you feel the need is to a gas stove, :)

GG
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Got to think of it (and googled) - my electric range produces enough EMF as it is.

Gas has its own issues; besides, I have no gas line into the kitchen.
Two years ago a house blew to pieces less than a mile away - gas leak.
But of course, my own house and water are too heated by gas.
Oh my!

Not going to worry about it.
 

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The best corn bread is baked in a cast iron Skillet. Also Pizza is great, I agree with ursa_minor on that. I also cook all beef, pork, and chicken in the cast iron. Hash browns or country fried taters do well also, especially with some ham and diced onions mixed in. I have a cast iron bacon press that I use in my cast iron griddle pan and it comes out nice and flat and evenly cooked. I haven't tried it yet, but I'm betting that cakes and pies would do wonderful as well in cast iron. I don't cook using oils so pancakes and fish get cooked in Teflon-type non-stick pans.
 

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My wife is of Italian decent, grew up cooking with a great grandmother, grandmother and mother, is a chemical engineer, first in her class with a degree from a great east coast university. While i was overseas working, she took classes at the French Culinary Institute in New York City where she cooked with chefs you may have seen on television and got her degree as a trained French Chef. She knows cooking and as testimate, I went from 185 lbs able to carry 90 lbs on a 25 mile run to, well, larger...

While we can afford to buy almost anything she wants for her kitchen (note $20K stove) she trolls flea markets for her cast iron, knows the maker marks, weights and styles better than anyone. Its what she wants to cook with and while she can cook fancy stuff, her corn bread is a legend. She pretty much stays away from anything newer than the second world war. She'll buy stuff that is old, yucky and even rusty sometimes, scrub it down with steel wool almost shiny and then re-season it with cooking oil in the oven (not sure of the details, I'm not allowed in there) to a beautiful black. Fry an egg in one or a ham steak, better than non-stick!
 

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I gotta try corn bread in my CI bread baking pot.
Never occurred to me.
Duh.
You are going to love it. My mother always used CI for cornbread, both sticks and regular. I continue that tradition in the very same skillet she used. Not really a fan of the cornbread sticks, so that CI mold is stored somewhere.
 

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My wife is of Italian decent, grew up cooking with a great grandmother, grandmother and mother, is a chemical engineer, first in her class with a degree from a great east coast university. While i was overseas working, she took classes at the French Culinary Institute in New York City where she cooked with chefs you may have seen on television and got her degree as a trained French Chef. She knows cooking and as testimate, I went from 185 lbs able to carry 90 lbs on a 25 mile run to, well, larger...
Can I come over for dinner ;)
 

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I love being in the kitchen or near fire, so here's my 2 cents:

#1 - It is a coinkydink that this post came up. Last weekend, a young couple asked to borrow my dutch oven for a camping trip. I quickly typed up cleaning instructions for my precious cast iron before they arrived, and then placed it in a plastic sleeve with re-seasoning directions! (Pot was brought back perfect with the instructions!)

#2 - Grandma gave the best tip: ONLY CLEAN CAST IRON WITH OIL and SALT. Salt is your abrasive (you can assist with a plastic scraper or scrubby - never metal or steel wool for me). You can rinse with hot water, but MUST DRY immediately. I have rarely had to re-season my skillets or dutch oven by following "Grandma's rules."

#3 - As for the hot handle comment in this thread, if you ever see one of the attached at a craft show, buy some! Or, if you DIY, sew some.

#4 - I agree that secondhand finds or hand-me-downs are best! I have wonderful very small to 12" size skillets from GOODWILL, and most have markings 8, SK, Made in USA, 01 or 8-3, or K on handle. Means nothing to me. I even found glass lids for 99 cents each at Goodwill to fit the skillets perfectly! I bought one new Lodge, square grilling skillet - very hard to clean and it took YEARS of trials to finally season it well enough.

#5 - Unfortunately, I no longer have a stove with metal coils or grates as burners. So I do not use my cast iron as much as previously. I DO for meat or poultry when a meal has to be tops, but I'm afraid of scratching or breaking my glass-top range (cast iron is heavy and I drop stuff). So now, I use my clad bottom, stainless steel daily. BTW, stainless steel is non-stick, and if you burn something, you CAN let it set overnight in water (option to add the miracle worker DAWN dish soap or vinegar and baking soda).

Off topic - You CAN also use a flat-bottom, old-style, heavy Presto pressure cooker/canner on a glass-top range. I did it with great fear and had no problems on my new Whirlpool appliance! (Companies are not going to put that in writing. And if your glass breaks, you did not read this tip here.)

#6 - Finally, do not let your salivating, begging, beautiful dog lick the drippings from cast iron. :no: I made that mistake once. It requires re-seasoning the pan!
View attachment Season a Cast Iron Pan.pdf
View attachment Cleaning Cast Iron.pdf
Cast iron skillet handle potholder.jpg

Simple instructions and photo attached. (I'm always weary of uploading attachments correctly.)
 

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I have to add an edit to my earlier post regarding my wife using steel wool on cleaning Cast Iron post. When I questioned her on using steel wool (after referring to me as I believe "a room temperature IQ idiot") she informed me that she had only use steel wool once, apparently she had picked up a skillet in a Flea Market in Wiscasset Maine, that was historically significant that someone had melted some plastic type of material. She felt it was a significant piece from the 1800's and after scraping out what she could, she polished it down with fine steel wool to remove and trace contaminates (chemical engineer side) and then finished it out with salt and olive oil-apparently she has that in common with Rus's Grandma! After 34 years, I don't necessary listen or pay attention to everything she says or does. :scratch:
 

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Got to think of it (and googled) - my electric range produces enough EMF as it is.
Gray Goose said:
Sorry, I did some power transmission Studies (Transmission Line theory, Micro wave guide , Induced power transformers) for a 4 year degree, and the Induction if "focused out" to induce "heat" in this instance, into the Pan, the presumption that Zero Induction comes past the surface of the pan and that Aforementioned Induction is "Harm less And not removing food value" from what we are cooking, has not been clearly communicated. It may be fine with some oils and some foods, but deep in my gray matter "Magnetizing, inducing to the point of high heat, is not harmless.

I'll stick with radiated.
Electric stoves with heat coils use alternating current to induce heat in the metal which transfers the heat through radiation or conduction into cooking pans. Induction stoves use alternating magnetic fields to induce heat in the cooking pan.

Metals used in cookware - iron, steel, copper, aluminum - are all electrically conductive, though only iron and steel are magnetic. As such, they all provide a shield or barrier to all electromagnetic fields (EMF). Food is not exposed to radiation like in a microwave.

If food cooked on an electric stove is has any exposure to EMF, it is most likely from the power lines embedded in the walls. Foods cannot be magnetized because they contain only trace molecular quantities of iron.
 

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I have to add an edit to my earlier post regarding my wife using steel wool on cleaning Cast Iron post. When I questioned her on using steel wool (after referring to me as I believe "a room temperature IQ idiot") she informed me that she had only use steel wool once, apparently she had picked up a skillet in a Flea Market in Wiscasset Maine, that was historically significant that someone had melted some plastic type of material. She felt it was a significant piece from the 1800's and after scraping out what she could, she polished it down with fine steel wool to remove and trace contaminates (chemical engineer side) and then finished it out with salt and olive oil-apparently she has that in common with Rus's Grandma! After 34 years, I don't necessary listen or pay attention to everything she says or does. :scratch:
:thumbsup: I think I need to edit my profile! Rus is Michele (bees R us).
 

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I hope y'all don't mind a resurrection of this topic but oafter reading some of the thread about cleaning cast iron reminded me of an incident with one of my Dutch ovens. A few years ago, I made a nice pot of chili for a Sunday School party. There was a bit of the chili left over and the host asked if he could keep the rest. He promised to take care of my pot and return it to me the next Sunday. He did that. It was perfectly cleaned ... in a dishwasher.

I didn't lose my mind but got close. It has been reseasoned, used for more chili cooks, and passed on to one of my daughters.
 
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