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Discussion Starter #1
I am sorry for the bad english, i hope i will be understood:

I would like to know what tools i need to buy for making
the holes in the hive external wood that used to lift the hive (handles)
and also the tools for making te two notchs the frames sitting on.

If someone can give me a link, so i can see it and understand
it would be very helpfull.

Many thanks

Randi
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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I usually cut mine with a Dado blade on a table saw. But you can also cut them with a chisel or a skil saw and a chisel. You can buy a fancy shaper blade for a shaper and cut them that way and make those fancy looking ones... but mine are usually just a groove 3/4" wide and 3/8" deep and four or five inches long...
 

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If you don't already have a dado set, they are expensive and I wouldn't buy one just for that. They can be cut with a table saw that has a titing arbor but that process is tricky and can be dangerous if you don't do it just right.

I would recommend just nailing and gluing a cleat onto the outside of the boxes for a handle. Take a piece of scrap wood that is two inches wide and the same length of the short side of your boxes, rip it in the middle with your saw blade on about a 15 degree tilt. That sould yield two cleats that you can nail on so that they are under-cut for better grip when you lift tie boxes.
 

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The notches explained"
The frame rest can be a strip of wood nailed to the inside of the hive ends so that the frame can rest on the strip.
The strip can be about 3/8" X 3/8" x the inside dimention of your box.
or, 3/8" X 1/2"
Good luck.
Ernie
 

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If you do not have the power tools, for the hand holds you can just attach a couple of 1x2 boards to the front and back hives to use for lifting. I like the angled cut like Carl F recommended if you have a table saw
 

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I like to still install the cleats all the way around. Because it make a deeper finger hold area. Plus it makes the box stronger. The down side is that they dont stand on end then. for clean up with out a jig to hold them.
 

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Handles can be substituted with cleats (bars of wood on the outside).

And frame rests can be made by a dado blade (one cut), table saw (two cuts), or homemade by either a strip like Ernie says or by having frames rest on the wall and the "rim" be a second piece outside:

Like this Nuc
 

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I actually got into keeping bees because I like building the equipment. :eek:

Furring strip cleats, two cuts on the table saw for the frame rests. *If* you have a router, you can also use a rabbet bit for the frame rests. I know it's overkill, but I like the metal edge frame rest inserts, too.
 

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I cut straight handholds by putting a dado set on the table saw. Then, I place the wood on top of the saw at predetermined spots. Finally, I raise the blade a certain number of turns that I know will cut the right depth handhold. Lower the blade and I'm done. I don't worry about the "scoop". I just want enough of a handhold to grab the box.
 

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Frame rests can be cut with a hand saw, small hand plane, chisel, or a combination (all before assembly, of course).
 
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