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So wife sent me a message today ( I am out of town) that said there's black bees in the water tray. And they don't look like ours. My first thought was some kind of invasion so had her send a photo. After a long look I came up with the carpenter bee? Black body Has anyone had these in the Oakanagon area and do they cause any problem for the honey bee? Regards Joe
 

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they often try to get into the hives and the honey bees ball them. I found a couple dead carcasses out in front of the hives a few weeks ago when weather was hot and dry. The arn't a concern to me.
 

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My biggest problem with Carpenter bees is the damage they do on unpainted wood. Before I bought this old house, they had put lots of holes in the outbarn. I fixed it up but they can do quite a bit of damage.
 

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I made a simple-but-effective trap out of leftover cedar wood ... a square box with four holes drilled, one on each side, upward at about a 45º angle. (Find a drill-bit that just fits into the holes they've already made in the eaves, and use that.) There's a circular hole in the bottom of the box, and a mason-jar ring is attached to it. Screw on an empty jar and hang the trap from the eaves of the house, using a screw-eye on the top of the trap.

Then, if you can, kill a carpenter-bee and toss its body into the jar. "Dead bugs, apparently, attract bugs."

Soon enough, the jar will be full of (dying ...) insects who can't find their way out. As the bodies build up, the trap becomes all the more attractive. (Yuck.) And after a little, while the insect's life-cycle will be broken.

I've never, ever, seen a honeybee in one.
 
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