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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We run a honey processing operation in Zambia, Africa. Comb honey from top bar hives is arriving crushed in buckets. After further crushing the combs into smaller pieces we use the dripping method through mesh into buckets overnight in warm rooms. Depending on comb conditions (new/old) and the quantitity to strain into each bucket the residues still contain 20%-30% weight, guessing we loose 10-20% of honey. Any idea how to reduce the loss? Any experience with capping spinners or other machines for comb pieces? My worry is that capping spinners will not work because they are made for cappings. Any idea or experience is appreciated.
 

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As long as the load is distributed evenly and the capacity of the machine is not exceeded, what is the concern here ?

wax mixed with honey = wax mixed with honey, no matter what the source
 

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I run comb through my cappings spinner. Crush it thoroughly. The thicker the honey is the more honey stays in the wax. My spinner probably leaves 1lb. of honey in each gallon of wax, which I reclaim in my solar wax melter.
 

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You guys need to make a honey press instead of a spinner, it would be much easier to operate and maintain. WVMJ
I don't agree. My spinner has needed minimal repairs and maintenance in 30+ years, grease the bearing is it. To operate, I hit the on switch and put a bucket under the drain spout or aim the spout into my filter sump. The dumping and removal of wax would be comparable to a press, maybe less. In a press maybe the combs would have to wrapped in a filter cloth. My spinner filters with it's perforated basket. Lots of turning the pressure wheel or the need for a fancy hydraulic setup. For very thick honey a press would be advantageous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all answers. Pressing comb honey, which we did in a previous project, was abandoned because the honey gets cloudy and still a lot of honey remains in the pressing cake, depending on how much is pressed at a time. Pressing also involves a lot of labor in opposite to dripping. We will have to process 30 tons this season. What is the difference between a capping spinner and a system called spin/float? Do the spinners have a heating element/device or has the honey-wax mixture to be warmed before filling? Thanks for any further advice.
 

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My spinner has no heat, just a perforated spinning basket. We place comb and cappings in at room temperature.
 
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