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1. Yesterday there were two swarms, both landed in the exact same tree. I'm told that sometimes when one hive swarms, the other will swarm together. Is this true?


2. I checked the two culprit hives, and indeed both had queen cells.

One of the hives had the following: Capped and uncapped queen cells - AND eggs.

Is it possible that the queen laid eggs the day before, or the same day before swarming? Population in the two hives were definitely smaller, but I was surprised to see nearly an entire frame full of eggs, capped AND uncapped (with royal jelly) queen cells in the one of them.
 

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1. Yesterday there were two swarms, both landed in the exact same tree. I'm told that sometimes when one hive swarms, the other will swarm together. Is this true? I can't speak to how common of a phenomenon this is, but I can tell you that it has happened to me twice in my beeyards, that I have personally witnessed. Perhaps it was just similar conditions of like-situated hives. Perhaps it was the end of a few rainy days and the first bright sunny day came out. Or perhaps it is something else. I don't know.


2. I checked the two culprit hives, and indeed both had queen cells.
One of the hives had the following: Capped and uncapped queen cells - AND eggs. I don't think this is too atypical. A laid egg remains an egg for 3 to 4 days. A "hatched" egg looks very similar to an egg until day 5 or 6. So it could be she stopped laying 48 hours before she took off. As to the capped and uncapped QCs, that is a very common find for me post-swarm.

Is it possible that the queen laid eggs the day before, or the same day before swarming? Population in the two hives were definitely smaller, but I was surprised to see nearly an entire frame full of eggs, capped AND uncapped (with royal jelly) queen cells in the one of them.
NM
 
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