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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Over the past few years canola has become an increasingly popular early season crop here. This spring there were numerous new plantings, some within easy forage distance of several of my yards.
As I'm extracting honey I'm trying to guess which honey might be canola. I know that it crystallizes easily and since I make and sell creamed honey I'd like to be able to separate it for that. But.....I don't really know for sure how to identify it.
Any suggestions from you canola experienced beekeepers?
 

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Over the past few years canola has become an increasingly popular early season crop here. This spring there were numerous new plantings, some within easy forage distance of several of my yards.
As I'm extracting honey I'm trying to guess which honey might be canola. I know that it crystallizes easily and since I make and sell creamed honey I'd like to be able to separate it for that. But.....I don't really know for sure how to identify it.
Any suggestions from you canola experienced beekeepers?
May be a reason to teach a new class, How to make creamed honey. Canola is all around us, sign me up.
Ted
 

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Over the past few years canola has become an increasingly popular early season crop here. This spring there were numerous new plantings, some within easy forage distance of several of my yards.
As I'm extracting honey I'm trying to guess which honey might be canola. I know that it crystallizes easily and since I make and sell creamed honey I'd like to be able to separate it for that. But.....I don't really know for sure how to identify it.
Any suggestions from you canola experienced beekeepers?
Below is a quote of a reply from Allen Dick of honeybeeworld.com. Allen is a retired commercial/provincial bee inspector. I read too that Canola honey crystallizes easy, this is what Allen said:

The information you are reading is probably old or not local. Most of the 'clover' honey in Western Canada comes from Canola. The new varieties make beautiful, light honey. As for granulation, sometimes Canola honey goes rock hard, but usually not. Nonetheless, it is wise to extract CH promptly and let the hives fill up with alfalfa and other honey in fall, then feed several gallons of sugar for winter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you Colino.
 

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Below is a quote of a reply from Allen Dick of honeybeeworld.com. Allen is a retired commercial/provincial bee inspector. I read too that Canola honey crystallizes easy, this is what Allen said:

The information you are reading is probably old or not local. Most of the 'clover' honey in Western Canada comes from Canola. The new varieties make beautiful, light honey. As for granulation, sometimes Canola honey goes rock hard, but usually not. Nonetheless, it is wise to extract CH promptly and let the hives fill up with alfalfa and other honey in fall, then feed several gallons of sugar for winter.
I've read similar information.

It is to be noted that canola can come from a number of different species. In Canada, it's mostly the Argentinian type (Brassica napus napus), as far as I know, but others are also probably available. It's same to assume that different species might have different nectar qualities. The pollen is very nutritious for the bees, though, so it's a pity (crime) that it's a neonic crop. It's like taking vitamin supplements laced with cyanide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
canola honey will grade water white, extra white, white
My first supers are, in many yards, filled with some of the lightest honey I've ever seen. Since I tend to harvest from the top down....mainly for my convenience.....I may need to change strategies to get those lowest supers off earlier.

The pollen is very nutritious for the bees, though, so it's a pity (crime) that it's a neonic crop. It's like taking vitamin supplements laced with cyanide.
If that's the case, I haven't seen any ill effects. My bees, by every indication, are thriving.

Thanks again to all.
 
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