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My first hive, swarmed Monday gone, I caught it with the queen and put it in a small nuc, then went out and purchased a new hive for them, I looked at the original hive to see a queen cell and that cell hatched on Thursday, now I cannot see her in the hive, I have been through the hive twice now, there is another queen cell in there, but until I see the queen I do not want to cull it. Is there any chance that she has swarmed as well?
 

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i dont know but Ive been told to stay out of a newly hatched queens hive, have heard they will fly on you. Give her time to harden, they will decide which one to keep. Good Luck. G
 

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Bees will be bees. Mine tend to requeen themselves, and I try not to cut out cells unless - as you say - you determine that you have a laying queen.

It is likely you have a virgin running around ( the original hive) and they are notoriously hard to spot. I imagine I lose a few swarms taking the hands off approach, but I believe there is also the balance of "too much interference" upsetting a new colony leading to supercedure. At least two of my hives have successfully requeened themselves this spring (and I suspect a third, right now). I may have lost one swarm, maybe, but my Buckfast bees rank very high in successful supercedure, and low swarming tendencies. I only wish I could get some of the pure Buckfast strains that I believe you have access to!

Welcome!
 

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Agree with Colobee. Use the medical directive, "First, do no harm". Fishing around in hives just to satisfy your curiosity does no good. Bee know how to supersede, and anything the clumsy keeper does just upsets the process. Leave it alone.
 

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stay out of the hive, virgins are tough to find in populated hives, wait two weeks then start worrying if you don't find any eggs/brood.
 

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Thank you for this reply it has answered my own questions. I am new to the bees life and often wonder am I doing this correctly. One hive is flourishing wonderfully and the other is lagging a bit. The lagging one has 'requirements itself and hopefully it will flourish as well. Thank you again Jamie mid Maine
 

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I notice there we actually 3 queen cells left, if I leave all 3 of them don't I run the risk of another swarm?
Yes. I think you're on the right track. If you cut those cells.....you stand the chance of leaving the hive hopelessly queenless.
If you leave those cells...and you have a queen....we all know what'll happen next.
On the other hand.....if you cannot find the new queen....what to do?
And then there is the possibility, as you suggested, that there may have already been a secondary swarm.
It is a beekeeper's dilemma.
My advice....look again if you have the chance....she may be out on mating flights during the afternoons and easy to miss. Otherwise, failing to find her....what choice do you have?
 

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What is the Varroa count? Queen cells attract varroa just like drone cells, and a large proportion of QC in hives without a sanitary Varroa policy will have Varroa crippled queen pupa. If the hive has a parasite population you will need 3 or 4 QC to have some confidence of hatching a Queen that is healthy enough to fly.

I have a long running Treatment Free experiment (10 + years) in addition to the treated hives. I got some criticism on this forum for not making increase against the TF colonies (these are hived swarms I let run to get stats on survival demography), so this year I did "expansion model" splits in June from the early swarms. I saw queen "crawling" with DWV, and when I opened queen cells lots of happy reddish mites hopped out of the QC.

I expect some of the rash of queenless annecdotes we are reading about follow natural supersedure that fails due to uncontrolled varroa killing the virgins.
 

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Queen cells attract varroa just like drone cells
I'd read that the opposite was true.....that varroa avoided qc....which would make sense as their reproductive success in qc would be zero.
 

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Dan,
I assumed that Varroa avoid QC, or the nurses were especially vigilant in keeping the mites out, or the mites drowned in royal jelly.

However, when I saw a Queen in the yard crawling with DWV, it prompted me to open and actually look at capped, purple eye queens --- and the answer was not pretty. Mites are in QC in numbers 3-4-5.

So I go with real world observation over the myths floating around the i'net.
 

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So I go with real world observation over the myths floating around the i'net.
JW....I'm having difficulty deciding which internet myth to believe.

- and the answer was not pretty. Mites are in QC in numbers 3-4-5.
or

http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/89/09/55/PDF/hal-00890955.pdf
Few female mites utilized developing queens for hosts. Only 1-2% of spring
cells and late summer cells from cell builders containing open brood were infested.
 

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I would just stay out of it. Check back on it in three weeks by that time your queen should be mated and laying. The more you dig around in it at this stage the more of a chance you will do more harm than good. Trust me if your hive swarmed they at least have a virgin queen. The only other thing that can go wrong is something happening to her on her mating flight. I have had hives kill newly mated queens because I inspected the hive too much. There is a fine line between inspecting enough so you know how the hive is doing and inspecting too much. Give them some time it sounds like you have already been in it a bunch lately. Chances are your varroa count is not that high yet wait until after your queen is mated and then do some mite counts.
 
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