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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't want to have to pry open the hive and worry about feeding right now. I'm thinking there might be pollen available now for them. Do we have to worry about feeding an overwintered colony on April 28 in the lower New Hampshire region?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, they vary, but last frost date isn't till mid-May. Right now temps are running around 50s during the day, 30s at night.
 

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If the bees are collecting pollen, you should be able to see them bringing it in without opening the hive....it seems to me that if one wants to manage bees on any scale that observing from the outside is the very least that is required.
 

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not allows the case, i am a perfect case i didnt see pollen being brought into the hive but i infered it by the constant goings and coming of the bees. I am thinking that the pollen isnt bright enough for me to see yet, where the hive is there isnt any bright colored blooms. that being said only 10 miles away there is nothing but bright color blooms so i am thinking it is slow getting closer to the hive.
 

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I thought about that as well, they are eating the sugar water and pollen paddies i gave to them, i have to assume the queen is there because when i last checked they where very docile and tameish. this friday i plan on doing a extensive inspection, and expect to get stung.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Update - hope my pulled calf muscle will forgive me, but I limped down to the hive and they still have plenty of sugar patties left (I don't think they like my cooking) and their pollen sacks were filled with pale yellow. I don't know what that is, I know daffodils are up, but I don't think they like daffodils, so I don't know. They looked very happy, hopefully not swarm happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sure they can….there's a maple bloom starting here in northern New England.

But we're supposed to get rain on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. No flow then, eh?
So do you have feed in their hives, or do you just let them wing it until the weather improves?
 

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My bees are an hour South and West of you, I have two hives and two recently installed packages. The two hives I have been feeding pretty much constantly since the beginning of March, and the packages for a month. They all consume about a gallon of 1:1 each, weekly. The hives have about 10 - 15lbs of honey and some pollen but they still consume the syrup, so I will keep supplying it until they don't want it anymore. In my syrup mix I added apple cider vinegar for the first time. I am not sure if it's my perception or the conditions or what but the girls really seem to take to this mix more than with just sugar water. I put 1/2 a pollen patty in each hive in March one is almost gone the other was just barely touched.
 

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This is an instance where local conditions trump the calendar. The only way you can tell is to look. Is there pollen available? Watch your entrance to see if it is being brought in. Are the Maples blooming where you are? How about Willows? Here considerably to the north of you I'm waiting for natural pollen. The bees are too - I watched them poking around some very tired Alder catkins a few days ago. Natural nectar? A few weeks off by my estimate here. Hard to say for your area. There is no substitute for looking in your hive and knowing what the bees have for reserves. You want to do invasive inspections on a warm day. I used to wait for 60F (and I still want 60F) but if the bees are flying I think it is safe enough. If you are concerned they do not have adequate food reserves and you are looking at a prolonged rainy period, by all means get some feed on - have it in contact with the cluster.
 
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