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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if I could weed kill a bunch of weeds along my creek. I do not have the weed kill on me atm. But I know that it is a concentrate, and it needs to be diluted. After it is mixed in water, it will be sprayed on the 3-foot tall weeds. The weeds will stay looking alive for about 3 days, then they will start wilting.
Because I'm spraying around 100 yards away from the hive, I don't think I'll have any problem with the weed kill floating around in the air, unless that is a big deal. (I have no experience with beekeeping whatsoever, and I'm expecting my nuc end of may.)
If anyone could give me some info that they know, it'll be greatly appreciated.
 

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Why would you weed kill next to a Creek?

Try Corn meal gluten. not deadly to people animals or bugs and no problem about getting in the water.

Were do you think the run off from the weed kill will end up???:no:

Brooklyn
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can't reach the weeds with my 72" deck mower. So I need to weed kill it. If I don't, it gets out of control. I'm just wondering if the bees will get hurt from pollinating the weeds that have weed kill on them. I'm not too worried about the vapor in the air, i'll just choose a day the either has the wind blowing in the opposite direction, or when there is no wind at all.
 

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The weeds will dry in a day. so if you spray before you get the bees they should be ok. The chemical will stay in the soil for years.:eek:

there is less destructive chemicals out there. Look around the internet

I just don't like harmful chemicals.

Brooklyn
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It only lasts one year in the soil. I'm thinking more on next year. You will be surprised, there are ALOT of huge weeds out there. probably an average 3 foot high weeds. But, for the time being, i'm just gonna worry about his year, and worry about next year when it comes along. ;)
 

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follow the rate of application...do not over dose with product and do not spray to drip off the plant.
Find out what spray you are going to use, and check if it is honey bee safe

There are several types of herbicides out there.

Round up kills every weed
there are some that kill just grass and weeds but not clover and alfalfa...Valpar
And there are some...name eludes me that just kills broad leaf weeds.

Herbicides are best sprayed in the early morning while the dew is on or in the evening when the wind goes down.

Check your information about herbicides that stays in the soil for years. I know valpar which is not a contact spray, but goes in the soil and kills at the roots stays in the soil for a year. Can not plant oats, wheat and such. However, crops like millet and canola can be planted the following year.

Do your research and spray accordingly...If it does not drip off the plant or if you do not over kill the soil, it will not leach into the creek. That said, if you spray just before a rain, before the product has a chance to dry or get into the root...you lost your $ and it might leach. Proper application and read read read the directions

Edit
spray applications best work on young stock, short, three leaf stage. You might be best to whipper snip or mow the best you can and then let it regrow for a few days then spray.
 

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Round up kills every weed
there are some that kill just grass and weeds but not clover and alfalfa...Valpar
And there are some...name eludes me that just kills broad leaf weeds.


Roundup doesn't do very good on broadleaf plants. 2,4-D is good for broadleaf control, and is often mixed with Roundup for a good burndown coverage.
 

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I try to spray just before dark as the bees are in the hive and most flowers close up after dark.Plus bees will always go to the center of the flower which is closed after dark
 

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Many beekeepers use roundup right up to the hive to control grass and weeds.
Thats what I do in each yard. Wait till dark and spray away from the hives. Keeps me from having to weedeater around the hives....my bees hate the weedeater...they get nasty. Round-up solves the problem
 

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Buy a scythe and learn to use it. Or burn out the weeds with a propane torch. Both are options that require a little more work than sitting on a lawn tractor. But the upside is that you are not dumping poison straight into the water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't think I need to worry about the weed killer leaking into the water. I have sprayed these weeds last year and the only probability it that some of the weed vapor may land in the water. It is a big creek, but it doesn't have much water in it (probably 6 inches at the most average). It only has a lot of water in it after a rainstorm. And the creek usually recedes within one day. But lets say I do get some weed kill in the water, what harm would that do? I think it would be so diluted that there will be no matter. I'm not sure though, because I've never kept bees before.
 

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Just wondering if I could weed kill a bunch of weeds along my creek. I do not have the weed kill on me atm. But I know that it is a concentrate, and it needs to be diluted. After it is mixed in water, it will be sprayed on the 3-foot tall weeds. The weeds will stay looking alive for about 3 days, then they will start wilting.
Because I'm spraying around 100 yards away from the hive, I don't think I'll have any problem with the weed kill floating around in the air, unless that is a big deal. (I have no experience with beekeeping whatsoever, and I'm expecting my nuc end of may.)
If anyone could give me some info that they know, it'll be greatly appreciated.
Why do you "need" to kill these plants? Sit back and ask yourself what happens if you don't.

If this is a disturbed space, some other plant will repopulate it soon enough, and you'll never keep up. Repeated applications will only serve to make chemical companies rich, and poison the space you live in.

I suggest only killing "weeds" if their properties present a clear and present problem to human safety or livestock.
 

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Roundup breaks down in the soil withing days of application, it's very safe.
and one treatment last pretty much all summer
If it breaks down in a couple of days, how can it last pretty much all summer?

But lets say I do get some weed kill in the water, what harm would that do? I think it would be so diluted that there will be no matter.
Multiply that philosophy by a thousand and you see the problem. Eventually someone downstream from you drinks that water.
 

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Try Corn meal gluten. not deadly to people animals or bugs and no problem about getting in the water.
Corn gluten meal will have little/no effect on growing plants, that's why I can put it on the garden to kill germinating weeds without hurting vegetables.

It is high in nitrogen which is a problem in water(algae blooms, I think).

Timothy, you should work on a longer term plan than spraying every year. Something perrennial that will outdo the weeds...
 

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Roundup breaks down in the soil withing days of application, it's very safe.
It's not safe, does not break down, and this is not an appropriate use for it.

Once the soil has been made bare with Round-up, is he going to replace the vegetation? More likely, it will be left bare, and another pioneer species (aka weed) will move in to populate the disturbed space.

And so it begins again.
 
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