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I bought some wildflower honey from my local farmers market. The honey I bought looks sketch though. It refuses to crystallize. I put it in the fridge for a week and it will not crystallize!!! I know that raw honey will not freeze. Should I put it to the test by freezing it? I figured if it froze, it won't be raw because it will contain water. But if it doesn't, then it means its raw. Is that a good way to test the honey?
 

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Is that a good way to test the honey?
I generally taste it to test honey.
Not sure what your shooting for here. Are you trying to determine that it's honey? Different honey has different looks. There can even be different honey from the same super but on different frames.Honey has some water to it....approx 17% or thereabouts.
ALL honey will EVENTUALLY crystallize. This could be just very very fresh honey and no where near the point of crystallizing.
 

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I bought some wildflower honey from my local farmers market. The honey I bought looks sketch though. It refuses to crystallize. I put it in the fridge for a week and it will not crystallize!!! I know that raw honey will not freeze. Should I put it to the test by freezing it? I figured if it froze, it won't be raw because it will contain water. But if it doesn't, then it means its raw. Is that a good way to test the honey?
Putting honey in the refrigerator or the freezer will slow the crystalization process. So doing so won't be any kind of test at all. It'll just make using your honey more difficult.
 

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I think the OP is under the impression that raw honey contains no water. However raw honey tipically contains 17% moisture. Raw honey will become extremely viscous in the freezer just as pasteurized honey will. The best temperature to cause cristalization of any honey is about 60f. The crystal structure can still move and form in the liquid, but it's not warm enough to destroy that structure. (110f)
Luke
 

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I think he's under the impression that raw honey is neccessarily crystallized.
 

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Putting honey in the refrigerator or the freezer will slow the crystalization process.
Mark, I know putting honey in the freezer retards crystallization, but I thought honey in the fridge would accelerate crystallization.
 

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hnadeir,
you seem to have some trust problems. All of your other Posts are from a Thread you started because you were suspicious of someone you were considering buying honey from. I really think you should spend some time finding someone who sells honey they take from their own hives, get to know them, and ask them all of these questions you are asking people you don't know and can't look in the eye. Then you should have fewer issues w/ trusting whether something is what someone says it is.

That, or buy some bees and produce your own honey. I hope you can take that as friendly advice. That's how it is meant.
 

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Mark, I know putting honey in the freezer retards crystallization, but I thought honey in the fridge would accelerate crystallization.
Nope. Unless your fridge temp is set at 53 degrees. Mine isn't.

I'm picky about words sometimes,:lpf:, you can promote crystallization by keeping what you want to crystallize at 53 or 55 degree, somewhere around there. I always get mixed up on the exact right temp. I guess there isn't much difference between promote and accelerate, but that's how I see it. No matter what word one uses, it takes time. Anything above or below 53 degrees will take longer.
 

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Nope. Unless your fridge temp is set at 53 degrees. Mine isn't.

I'm picky about words sometimes,:lpf:, you can promote crystallization by keeping what you want to crystallize at 53 or 55 degree, somewhere around there. I always get mixed up on the exact right temp. I guess there isn't much difference between promote and accelerate, but that's how I see it. No matter what word one uses, it takes time. Anything above or below 53 degrees will take longer.
Exact temperature, I'm not sure, but this is exactly my experience.
 

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Michael Bush likes to chime in on this w/ the exact temp. I usually say 55 degrees, I can remember that. But I think it actually is 53 degrees. But, what's a degree or two between friends.
 

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My last years spring honey is still pourable now, but starting to show a definite haze. Stored at room temperature. The fall honey, same storage has been a soft solid but not gritty, for several months now. Depends on what the bees are working besides storage temperature. I thought the most rapid crystallization was at 57 F. but that is merely quibbling. I agree with Mark; if the OP suspects he is being diddled, find another source.
 

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"The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind, the answer is blowin' in the wind." "When will they ever learn, when will they ever learn.?"
Most of the things I know are wrong. What's up w/ that?
 
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